charlotte


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Char·lotte 1

 (shär′lət) 1896-1985.
Grand duchess of Luxembourg. Ascending to the throne in 1919, she took her government into exile during the Nazi occupation of Luxembourg and supported her people through regular radio broadcasts. She returned triumphantly in 1945 and ruled until 1964 before abdicating to her son, Jean (born 1921).

Char·lotte 2

 (shär′lət)
A city of southern North Carolina near the South Carolina border southwest of Greensboro. Settled c. 1750 and named for the wife of King George III of England, it is the largest city in the state.

char·lotte

 (shär′lət)
n.
A dessert consisting of a mold of sponge cake or bread with a filling, as of fruits, whipped cream, or custard.

[French, from the name Charlotte.]

charlotte

(ˈʃɑːlət)
n
1. (Cookery) a baked dessert served hot or cold, commonly made with fruit and layers or a casing of bread or cake crumbs, sponge cake, etc: apple charlotte.
2. (Cookery) short for charlotte russe
[C19: from French, from the name Charlotte]

Charlotte

(ˈʃɑːlət)
n
(Placename) a city in S North Carolina: the largest city in the state. Pop: 584 658 (2003 est)

char•lotte

(ˈʃɑr lət)

n.
any of various desserts usu. made by lining a mold with cake or bread and filling it with fruit, whipped cream, custard, or gelatin.
[1790–1800; < French, generic use of the given name]

Char•lotte

(ˈʃɑr lət)

n.
a city in S North Carolina. 441,297.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Charlotte - the largest city in North Carolina; located in south central North Carolina
NC, North Carolina, Old North State, Tar Heel State - a state in southeastern United States; one of the original 13 colonies
2.charlotte - a mold lined with cake or crumbs and filled with fruit or whipped cream or custard
afters, dessert, sweet - a dish served as the last course of a meal
charlotte russe - lady fingers enclosing Bavarian cream
Translations
Šarlota
Charlotte
Charlotte
Lotta
Charlotte
Charlotta

Charlotte

[ˈʃɑːlət] NCarlota

Charlotte

n
Charlotte f
(Cook) charlotteCharlotte f; charlotte russeCharlotte Malakoff

charlotte

[ˈʃɑːlət] n (Culin) → charlotte f inv
References in classic literature ?
It is nothing, Charlotte, but a drunken man; if people will drink, they must abide the consequences.
He was inwardly and deeply admiring the most youthful of the females, for the natural and simple display of those very qualities that he forgot himself to exercise, when he was roused with a feeling of something like mortification, by hearing Charlotte exclaim, with a slight glow on her cheek--
Charlotte treated him ill, because Noah did; and Mrs.
One day, Oliver and Noah had descended into the kitchen at the usual dinner-hour, to banquet upon a small joint of mutton--a pound and a half of the worst end of the neck--when Charlotte being called out of the way, there ensued a brief interval of time, which Noah Claypole, being hungry and vicious, considered he could not possibly devote to a worthier purpose than aggravating and tantalising young Oliver Twist.
It was a family saying that "you never knew which way Charlotte Bartlett would turn.
Charlotte declined for herself; she had been there in the rain the previous afternoon.
While the family were in this confusion, Charlotte Lucas came to spend the day with them.
Elizabeth passed quietly out of the room, Jane and Kitty followed, but Lydia stood her ground, determined to hear all she could; and Charlotte, detained first by the civility of Mr.
Charlotte has won all the prizes," she added, giving her sister-in-law a little pat, which made Lady Otway more uncomfortable still.
Aunt Charlotte was saying that it's no good being married unless you submit to your husband," said Katharine, framing her aunt's words into a far more definite shape than they had really worn; and when she spoke thus she did not appear at all old-fashioned.
For the convenience of Charlotte and her child, they were to be more than two days on their journey, and Mr.
Marianne entered the house with a heart swelling with emotion from the consciousness of being only eighty miles from Barton, and not thirty from Combe Magna; and before she had been five minutes within its walls, while the others were busily helping Charlotte to show her child to the housekeeper, she quitted it again, stealing away through the winding shrubberies, now just beginning to be in beauty, to gain a distant eminence; where, from its Grecian temple, her eye, wandering over a wide tract of country to the south-east, could fondly rest on the farthest ridge of hills in the horizon, and fancy that from their summits Combe Magna might be seen.