chase


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chase 1

 (chās)
v. chased, chas·ing, chas·es
v.tr.
1. To follow rapidly in order to catch or overtake; pursue: chased the thief.
2. To follow (game) in order to capture or kill; hunt: chase foxes.
3. To seek the favor or company of persistently: chased me until I agreed to a date.
4. To put to flight; drive: chased the dog away.
5. Baseball
a. To cause (an opposing pitcher) to be removed from a game by batting well.
b. To swing at and miss (a pitch, especially one out of the strike zone).
v.intr.
1. To go or follow in pursuit.
2. Informal To go hurriedly; rush: chased all over looking for us.
n.
1. The act of chasing; pursuit.
2.
a. The hunting of game: the thrill of the chase.
b. Something that is hunted or pursued; quarry.
3. Chiefly British
a. A privately owned, unenclosed game preserve.
b. The right to hunt or keep game on the land of others.
Idioms:
chase (one's) tail
To exert oneself vigorously but ineffectually.
give chase
To engage in pursuit of quarry: Police gave chase to the speeding car.

[Middle English chasen, to hunt, from Old French chacier, from Vulgar Latin *captiāre, from Latin captāre, to catch; see catch.]

chase 2

 (chās)
n. Printing
A rectangular steel or iron frame into which pages or columns of type are locked for printing or plate making.

[Perhaps from French châsse, case, reliquary, from Old French chasse, from Latin capsa.]

click for a larger image
chase3
floral chase motif on a lipstick case

chase 3

 (chās)
n.
1.
a. A groove cut in an object; a slot: the chase for the quarrel on a crossbow.
b. A trench or channel for drainpipes or wiring.
2. The part of a gun in front of the trunnions.
3. The cavity of a mold.
tr.v. chased, chas·ing, chas·es
1. To groove; indent.
2. To cut (the thread of a screw).
3. To decorate (metal) by engraving or embossing.

[Possibly from obsolete French chas, groove, enclosure, from Old French, from Latin capsa, box. V., variant of enchase.]

chase

(tʃeɪs)
vb
1. to follow or run after (a person, animal, or goal) persistently or quickly
2. (tr; often foll by out, away, or off) to force to run (away); drive (out)
3. (tr) informal to court (a member of the opposite sex) in an unsubtle manner
4. informal (often foll by: up) to pursue persistently and energetically in order to obtain results, information, etc: chase up the builders and get a delivery date.
5. (intr) informal to hurry; rush
n
6. the act of chasing; pursuit
7. any quarry that is pursued
8. (Hunting) Brit an unenclosed area of land where wild animals are preserved to be hunted
9. (Hunting) Brit the right to hunt a particular quarry over the land of others
10. (Hunting) the chase the act or sport of hunting
11. (Horse Racing) short for steeplechase
12. (Tennis) real tennis a ball that bounces twice, requiring the point to be played again
13. cut to the chase informal chiefly US to start talking about the important aspects of something
14. give chase to pursue (a person, animal, or thing) actively
[C13: from Old French chacier, from Vulgar Latin captiāre (unattested), from Latin captāre to pursue eagerly, from capere to take; see catch]
ˈchaseable adj

chase

(tʃeɪs)
n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing a rectangular steel or cast-iron frame into which metal type and blocks making up pages are locked for printing or plate-making
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) the part of a gun barrel from the front of the trunnions to the muzzle
3. (Building) a groove or channel, esp one that is cut in a wall to take a pipe, cable, etc
vb (tr)
(Building) Also: chamfer to cut a groove, furrow, or flute in (a surface, column, etc)
[C17 (in the sense: frame for letterpress matter): probably from French châsse frame (in the sense: bore of a cannon, etc): from Old French chas enclosure, from Late Latin capsus pen for animals; both from Latin capsa case2]

chase

(tʃeɪs)
vb (tr)
1. (Jewellery) Also: enchase to ornament (metal) by engraving or embossing
2. (General Engineering) to form or finish (a screw thread) with a chaser
[C14: from Old French enchasser enchase]

chase1

(tʃeɪs)

v. chased, chas•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to follow rapidly or intently to seize, overtake, etc.; pursue: to chase a thief.
2. to pursue with intent to capture or kill, as game; hunt.
3. to follow or devote one's attention to with the hope of attracting, winning, etc.
4. to drive or expel forcibly: to chase the cat out.
v.i.
5. to follow in pursuit: to chase after someone.
6. to rush; hasten: chasing around all afternoon looking for a gift.
n.
7. the act of chasing; pursuit.
8. an object of pursuit.
9. Brit. a private game preserve.
11. the chase, the sport or occupation of hunting.
Idioms:
give chase, to go in pursuit.
[1250–1300; Middle English chacen < Middle French chasser to hunt, Old French chacier < Vulgar Latin *captiāre; see catch]
chase′a•ble, adj.

chase2

(tʃeɪs)

n.
1. a rectangular iron frame in which composed type is secured or locked for printing or platemaking.
2. a groove, furrow, or channel, as one made in a wall for pipes or ducts.
3. the forepart of a gun, containing the bore.
[1570–80; < Middle French chas, chasse < Late Latin capsus (masculine), capsum (neuter) enclosed space, variant of Latin capsa]

chase3

(tʃeɪs)

v.t. chased, chas•ing.
1. to ornament (metal) by engraving or embossing.
2. to cut (a screw thread), as with a chaser or machine tool.
[1400–50; late Middle English; aph. variant of enchase]

Chase

(tʃeɪs)

n.
1. Sal•mon Portland (ˈsæl mən) 1808–73, Chief Justice of the U.S. 1864–73.
2. Samuel, 1741–1811, U.S. jurist and leader in the American Revolution.

chase


Past participle: chased
Gerund: chasing

Imperative
chase
chase
Present
I chase
you chase
he/she/it chases
we chase
you chase
they chase
Preterite
I chased
you chased
he/she/it chased
we chased
you chased
they chased
Present Continuous
I am chasing
you are chasing
he/she/it is chasing
we are chasing
you are chasing
they are chasing
Present Perfect
I have chased
you have chased
he/she/it has chased
we have chased
you have chased
they have chased
Past Continuous
I was chasing
you were chasing
he/she/it was chasing
we were chasing
you were chasing
they were chasing
Past Perfect
I had chased
you had chased
he/she/it had chased
we had chased
you had chased
they had chased
Future
I will chase
you will chase
he/she/it will chase
we will chase
you will chase
they will chase
Future Perfect
I will have chased
you will have chased
he/she/it will have chased
we will have chased
you will have chased
they will have chased
Future Continuous
I will be chasing
you will be chasing
he/she/it will be chasing
we will be chasing
you will be chasing
they will be chasing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chasing
you have been chasing
he/she/it has been chasing
we have been chasing
you have been chasing
they have been chasing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chasing
you will have been chasing
he/she/it will have been chasing
we will have been chasing
you will have been chasing
they will have been chasing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chasing
you had been chasing
he/she/it had been chasing
we had been chasing
you had been chasing
they had been chasing
Conditional
I would chase
you would chase
he/she/it would chase
we would chase
you would chase
they would chase
Past Conditional
I would have chased
you would have chased
he/she/it would have chased
we would have chased
you would have chased
they would have chased
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chase - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capturechase - the act of pursuing in an effort to overtake or capture; "the culprit started to run and the cop took off in pursuit"
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
tracking, trailing - the pursuit (of a person or animal) by following tracks or marks they left behind
shadowing, tailing - the act of following someone secretly
stalking, stalk - the act of following prey stealthily
2.Chase - United States politician and jurist who served as chief justice of the United States Supreme Court (1808-1873)
3.chase - a rectangular metal frame used in letterpress printing to hold together the pages or columns of composed type that are printed at one time
frame - the framework for a pair of eyeglasses
Verb1.chase - go after with the intent to catchchase - go after with the intent to catch; "The policeman chased the mugger down the alley"; "the dog chased the rabbit"
tree - chase an animal up a tree; "the hunters treed the bear with dogs and killed it"; "her dog likes to tree squirrels"
pursue, follow - follow in or as if in pursuit; "The police car pursued the suspected attacker"; "Her bad deed followed her and haunted her dreams all her life"
quest - search the trail of (game); "The dog went off and quested"
hound, hunt, trace - pursue or chase relentlessly; "The hunters traced the deer into the woods"; "the detectives hounded the suspect until they found him"
run down - pursue until captured; "They ran down the fugitive"
chase away, dispel, drive away, drive off, drive out, run off, turn back - force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings; "Drive away potential burglars"; "drive away bad thoughts"; "dispel doubts"; "The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers"
2.chase - pursue someone sexually or romantically
court, romance, solicit, woo - make amorous advances towards; "John is courting Mary"
3.chase - cut a groove into; "chase silver"
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
4.chase - cut a furrow into a columns
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"

chase

verb
1. pursue, follow, track, hunt, run after, course She chased the thief for 100 yards.
2. woo, pursue, flirt with, run after, pay court to, set your cap at If he's not chasing women, he's out boozing with the lads.
3. drive away, drive, expel, hound, send away, send packing, put to flight Some farmers chase you off their land quite aggressively.
4. rush, run, race, shoot, fly, speed, dash, sprint, bolt, dart, hotfoot They chased down the stairs into the alley.
noun
1. pursuit, race, hunt, hunting He was arrested after a car chase.

chase

verb
1. To follow (another) with the intent of overtaking and capturing:
Idioms: be in pursuit, give chase.
2. To look for and pursue (game) in order to capture or kill it:
noun
The following of another in an attempt to overtake and capture:
Translations
صَيْد، اصْطِيادمُطَارَدَةمُطارَدَه، مُلاحَقَهيُطارِديُطارِدُ
pronásledovatstíháníhonitlovzahnat
jagejagtforfølgeforfølgelse
takaa-ajojahdatajahti
lovitipotjera
üldözüldözés
eftirföreltarekadÿraveiîar
追跡する追いかける追う追跡
추격추적추적하다
captare
medžioklėnusivytipersekiojimaspersekiotivijimasis
dzīšanadzīties pakaļizdzītvajāšanavajāt
urmărire
honodháňať
pregonzasledovatilovitipregnati
jagajaktförfölja
ไล่ตามการไล่ตาม
kovalamakpeşinden koşmaktakippeşinde koşmaav peşinde koşma
đuổisự theo đuổi

chase

1 [tʃeɪs]
A. Npersecución f
the chase (= hunting) → la caza
a car chaseuna persecución de coches
to give chase todar caza a, perseguir
to join in the chase for sthunirse a los que buscan algo
B. VT (= pursue) → perseguir
he's started chasing girlsya anda detrás de las chicas
to chase sb for moneyreclamar dinero a algn
C. VIcorrer
I've been chasing all over the place looking for youte he estado buscando por todas partes
to chase after sb (= pursue) → correr tras algn; (= seek out) → ir or andar a la caza de algn
chase away chase off VT + ADVahuyentar
chase down VT + ADV
1. (= track down) → localizar
2. (US) (= catch) → recabar, tratar de localizar
chase out VT + ADVechar fuera
chase up VT + ADV [+ information] → recabar, tratar de localizar; [+ person] → buscar; [+ matter] → investigar
I'll chase him up about itse lo voy a recordar
I'll chase it up for youinvestigaré lo que está pasando con lo tuyo
to chase up debtsreclamar el cobro de las deudas

chase

2 [tʃeɪs] VT [+ metal] → grabar, adornar grabando, cincelar

chase

[ˈtʃeɪs]
vt
(= pursue) [+ person, animal] → poursuivre, donner la chasse à
to chase sb/sth from (= chase away) → chasser qn/qch de
[+ job, money] → courir après
n
(= pursuit) → poursuite f, chasse f
to give chase → se lancer à la poursuite
the thrill of the chase (fig)le frisson de la poursuite
to cut to the chase → aller droit au but
chase away
vt
[+ animals, people] → faire la chasse à
[+ fears, blues] → chasser
chase down
vt (US) = chase up
chase up
vt (British)
[+ person] → relancer
[+ information] → rechercher

chase

1
nVerfolgungsjagd f; (Hunt) → Jagd f; (Horse Racing: = steeplechase) → Hindernisrennen nt; a (high-speed) car chaseeine Verfolgungsjagd im Auto; to give chasedie Verfolgung aufnehmen; to give chase to somebodyjds Verfolgung aufnehmen; the thrill of the chasedie Jagdlust; the chase for the championshipder Kampf um die Meisterschaft; to cut to the chase (esp US inf) → zum Kern der Sache kommen
vtjagen; (= follow)verfolgen; member of opposite sexhinterherlaufen (+dat), → nachlaufen (+dat); he’s been chasing that girl for monthser ist schon seit Monaten hinter der Frau her; to chase one’s own tail (fig)seine Zeit und Energie verschwenden
vi to chase after somebodyhinter jdm herrennen (inf); (in vehicle) → hinter jdm herrasen (inf); to chase aroundherumrasen (inf)

chase

2
vt (Tech) silver, metalziselieren

chase

[tʃeɪs]
1. ninseguimento, caccia
the chase (Hunting) → la caccia
to give chase → dare la caccia, mettersi all'inseguimento
2. vtinseguire
3. vi to chase after sbcorrere dietro a qn
chase away chase off vt + advcacciare via
chase up vt + adv
chase down (Am) vt + adv (information) → scoprire, raccogliere; (person) → scovare

chase

(tʃeis) verb
1. to run after; to pursue. He chased after them but did not catch them; We chased them by car.
2. (with away, ~off etc) to cause to run away. I often have to chase the boys away from my fruit trees.
noun
1. an act of chasing. We caught him after a 120 kph chase.
2. hunting (of animals). the pleasures of the chase.
give chase
to chase. The thieves ran off and the policeman gave chase.

chase

مُطَارَدَة, يُطارِدُ honička, pronásledovat jage, jagt Jagd, jagen κυνήγι, κυνηγώ persecución, perseguir jahdata, takaa-ajo pourchasser, poursuite loviti, potjera inseguimento, inseguire 追跡, 追跡する 추적, 추적하다 achtervolgen, achtervolging jage, jakt polowanie, ścigać perseguição, perseguir преследование, преследовать jaga, jakt ไล่ตาม, การไล่ตาม kovalamak, takip đuổi, sự theo đuổi 追赶
References in classic literature ?
Then recollecting the importance of securing the fugitive, he dashed aside the surrounding bushes, and pressed eagerly forward to lend his aid in the chase.
But, on the other hand, they connect diagonally, and the sprawling outlines run off in great slanting waves of optic horror, like a lot of wallowing seaweeds in full chase.
Is her healthful presence potent enough to chase away the crowd of pale, hideous, and sinful phantoms, that have gained admittance there since her departure?
If thou callest me that ill-name, I shall tell him of thee, and he will chase thy ship with a tempest
As yet the panic of the steed had given his unskilful rider an apparent advantage in the chase, but just as he had got half way through the hollow, the girths of the saddle gave way, and he felt it slipping from under him.
Where else but from Nantucket did those aboriginal whalemen, the Red-Men, first sally out in canoes to give chase to the Leviathan?
His necessities supplied, Derick departed; but he had not gained his ship's side, when whales were almost simultaneously raised from the mast-heads of both vessels; and so eager for the chase was Derick, that without pausing to put his oil-can and lamp-feeder aboard, he slewed round his boat and made after the leviathan lamp-feeders.
Well, I warn't long loosing the whoops down amongst the towheads; and I only tried to chase them a little while, anyway, be- cause it was worse than chasing a Jack-o'-lantern.
That famous ring that pricked its owner when he forgot duty and followed desire--I wonder if it pricked very hard when he set out on the chase, or whether it pricked but lightly then, and only pierced to the quick when the chase had long been ended, and hope, folding her wings, looked backward and became regret?
To be whimsical, therefore, in pursuit of a whim, fanciful in the chase of a fancy, is surely but to maintain the spirit of the game.
These oppressive enactments were the produce of the Norman Conquest, for the Saxon laws of the chase were mild and humane; while those of William, enthusiastically attached to the exercise and its rights, were to the last degree tyrannical.
You should not mope all day in your rooms, but should come out into the green garden, and hear the birds sing with joy among the trees, and see the butterflies fluttering above the flowers, and hear the bees and insects hum, and watch the sunbeams chase the dew-drops through the rose-leaves and in the lily-cups.