chastened


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chas·ten

 (chā′sən)
tr.v. chas·tened, chas·ten·ing, chas·tens
1. To correct by punishment or reproof; take to task.
2. To restrain; subdue: chasten a proud spirit.
3. To rid of excess; refine or purify: chasten a careless writing style.

[Alteration of obsolete chaste, from Middle English chasten, chastien, from Old French chastiier, from Latin castigāre; see castigate.]

chas′ten·er n.

chastened

(ˈtʃeɪsənd)
adj
subdued; humbled
Translations

chastened

[ˈtʃeɪsnd]
A. PT, PP of chasten
B. ADJ (by experience) → escarmentado; [tone] → sumiso
they seemed much chastenedparecían haberse arrepentido

chastened

[ˈtʃeɪsənd] adj (= humbled) → assagi(e), ramené(e) à la raison

chastened

[ˈtʃeɪsnd] adjabbattuto/a, provato/a
References in classic literature ?
The imagery of the Indian, both in his poetry and in his oratory, is oriental; chastened, and perhaps improved, by the limited range of his practical knowledge.
I don't grieve for myself,' he says, 'God, it seems, has chastened me.
How differently do the same acts of parental rigor appear in the eyes of the suffering child and of the chastened man
Her eyes betrayed that she had been crying, but in them shone a chastened exultation.
As I look out on the night, my tears fall fast, and my undisciplined heart is chastened heavily - heavily.
The geometry examination and all the others were over in due time and Anne arrived home on Friday evening, rather tired but with an air of chastened triumph about her.
His wild and enthusiastic imagination was chastened by the sensibility of his heart.
Sacred moments, when heart talked to heart in the silence of the night, turning affliction to a blessing, which chastened grief and strengthned love.
In some way chastened and purified by the mood they had been in, they became, not man and woman, not boy and girl, but excited little animals.
Rebecca, chastened and uplifted, had gone to school.
Miss Temple had always something of serenity in her air, of state in her mien, of refined propriety in her language, which precluded deviation into the ardent, the excited, the eager: something which chastened the pleasure of those who looked on her and listened to her, by a controlling sense of awe; and such was my feeling now: but as to Helen Burns, I was struck with wonder.
That sounds ill-natured: but she was so proud it became really impossible to pity her distresses, till she should be chastened into more humility.