chattel


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Related to chattel: chattel mortgage, Chattel Paper

chat·tel

 (chăt′l)
n.
1. Law An article of movable personal property.
2. A slave.

[Middle English chatel, movable property, from Old French, from Medieval Latin capitāle; see cattle.]

chattel

(ˈtʃætəl)
n
1. (Law) (often plural) property law
a. chattel personal an item of movable personal property, such as furniture, domestic animals, etc
b. chattel real an interest in land less than a freehold, such as a lease
2. (Law) goods and chattels personal property
[C13: from Old French chatel personal property, from Medieval Latin capitāle wealth; see capital1]

chat•tel

(ˈtʃæt l)

n.
1.
a. a movable article of personal property.
b. any tangible property other than land and buildings.
2. a slave.
[1175–1225; Middle English chatel < Old French. See cattle]
syn: See property.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chattel - personal as opposed to real property; any tangible movable property (furniture or domestic animals or a car etc)
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
article of furniture, furniture, piece of furniture - furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
personal estate, personal property, personalty, private property - movable property (as distinguished from real estate)

chattel

noun
Law. One's portable property:
belonging (often used in plural), effect (used in plural), good (used in plural), lares and penates, personal effects, personal property, possession (used in plural), property, thing (often used in plural).
Informal: stuff.
Law: movable (often used in plural).
Translations
References in classic literature ?
This fully explains what is the nature of a slave, and what are his capacities; for that being who by nature is nothing of himself, but totally another's, and is a man, is a slave by nature; and that man who is the property of another, is his mere chattel, though he continues a man; but a chattel is an instrument for use, separate from the body.
She was the chattel of the Minota's splendid skipper.
This same gentleman, having heard of the fame of George's invention, took a ride over to the factory, to see what this intelligent chattel had been about.
Primitive communism, chattel slavery, serf slavery, and wage slavery were necessary stepping-stones in the evolution of society.
Didn't I tell you that no chattel of the Church, no bond-slave of pope or bishop can enter my Man-Factory?
By giving a chattel mortgage on their growing wheat, they borrowed enough, at twenty per cent, to buy seed corn and a plow.
They have purchased your slave judges, they have debauched your slave legislatures, and they have forced to worse horrors than chattel slavery your slave boys and girls.
She was merely his chattel now, his convenience, his dog, his cringing and helpless slave, the humble and unresisting victim of his capricious temper and vicious nature.
In entering upon the duties of a slaveholder, she did not seem to perceive that I sus- tained to her the relation of a mere chattel, and that for her to treat me as a human being was not only wrong, but dangerously so.
Although he belonged to Dag Daughtry just as much as if the steward possessed a chattel bill of sale of him, his owner did not know that his anaesthetic twist of ravaged nerves tokened the dread disease.
I on the contrary affirm that I am still blind; for when I lost the use of my eyes, I saw in my house various chattels and valuable goods: but now, though he swears I am cured of my blindness, I am not able to see a single thing in it.
Old lodgers like myself soon grow as attached to our chattels as to a kinsman.