cheerfully


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cheer·ful

 (chîr′fəl)
adj.
1. Being in or characterized by good spirits; merry. See Synonyms at glad1.
2. Promoting a feeling of cheer; pleasant: a cozy, cheerful room.

cheer′ful·ly adv.
cheer′ful·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.cheerfully - in a cheerful manner; "he cheerfully agreed to do it"
cheerlessly - in an unhappy manner; "he cheerlessly set out to do the task"
Translations
بابْتِهاج، بِفَرَح، بانْشِراح الصَّدْر
vesele
fornøjetmuntert
glaîlega; fúslega
veselo
neşeyle

cheerfully

[ˈtʃɪəfʊlɪ] ADV
1. (= cheerily) [smile, say, greet] → alegremente, jovialmente
the nursery is cheerfully paintedla guardería está pintada con colores alegres
2. (= blithely) → alegremente, tranquilamente
he cheerfully ignored the doctor's adviceignoró alegremente or tranquilamente los consejos del médico
3. (= gladly) I could cheerfully strangle himcon mucho gusto lo estrangularía
she cheerfully agreed to try using his methodaceptó de buena gana probar su método

cheerfully

[ˈtʃɪərfʊli] adv
[say, greet] → gaiement
(= blithely) [ignore, admit] → allégrement
(= without hesitation) → sans la moindre hésitation

cheerfully

advfröhlich, vergnügt; I could cheerfully strangle him!den könnte ich glatt umbringen

cheerfully

[ˈtʃɪəfəlɪ] adv (gen) → allegramente; (willingly) → volentieri

cheer

(tʃiə) noun
1. a shout of approval, encouragement or welcome. Three cheers for the Queen!
2. mood. Be of good cheer.
verb
to give a shout of approval etc (to). The crowd cheered the new champion.
ˈcheerful adjective
full of, or causing, happiness. a cheerful smile; cheerful news.
ˈcheerfully adverb
ˈcheerfulness noun
ˈcheerless adjective
gloomy. a cheerless room.
cheers! interjection
1. used as a toast when drinking.
2. cheerio!.
3. thanks!.
ˈcheery adjective
lively and happy.
ˈcheerily adverb
ˈcheeriness noun
cheer up
to make or become (more cheerful). He cheered up when he saw her; The flowers will cheer her up.
References in classic literature ?
As young readers like to know `how people look', we will take this moment to give them a little sketch of the four sisters, who sat knitting away in the twilight, while the December snow fell quietly without, and the fire crackled cheerfully within.
It was with rather heavy hearts that the party set off, but Tom's spirits could not long stay clouded, and the scientist was so good-natured about the affair and seemed so eager to do the utmost to render Beecher's trick void, that the others fell into a lighter mood, and went on more cheerfully, though the way was rough and the packs heavy.
Burden,' he said cheerfully, as he put on a second pair of socks.
We are now fortified, garrisoned, and provisioned," cried Heyward cheerfully, "and may set Montcalm and his allies at defiance.
You gotta hell of a nerve to come to see me," he commented cheerfully.
But," he added more cheerfully, "it will do for a day or two, and perhaps you'll give us the pleasure of showing you the way there now.
A few clouds, floating high upward, caught some of the earliest light, and threw down its golden gleam on the windows of all the houses in the street, not forgetting the House of the Seven Gables, which--many such sunrises as it had witnessed--looked cheerfully at the present one.
He came quietly along, now and then shaking the oats about that he had in the sieve, and speaking cheerfully and gently to me:
Jurgis, who by this time would cheerfully have cracked the heads of all the gamblers in Chicago, inquired what would be coming to him; at which the Jew became still more confidential, and said that he had some tips on the New Orleans races, which he got direct from the police captain of the district, whom he had got out of a bad scrape, and who "stood in" with a big syndicate of horse owners.
The woman came cheerfully onward, talking, as she came, with the man who bore her trunk, and so passed up the plank into the boat.
The authority of government, even such as I am willing to submit to--for I will cheerfully obey those who know and can do better than I, and in many things even those who neither know nor can do so well--is still an impure one: to be strictly just, it must have the sanction and consent of the governed.
Bonaparte may talk of the three-o'clock-in-the-morning courage, but it is nothing to the courage which can sit down cheerfully at this hour in the afternoon over against one's self whom you have known all the morning, to starve out a garrison to whom you are bound by such strong ties of sympathy.