cheerless


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

cheer·less

 (chîr′lĭs)
adj.
Lacking cheer; depressing.

cheer′less·ly adv.
cheer′less·ness n.

cheerless

(ˈtʃɪəlɪs)
adj
dreary, gloomy, or pessimistic
ˈcheerlessly adv
ˈcheerlessness n

cheer•less

(ˈtʃɪər lɪs)

adj.
bereft of cheer; gloomy: cheerless surroundings.
[1570–80]
cheer′less•ly, adv.
cheer′less•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cheerless - causing sad feelings of gloom and inadequacy; "the economic outlook is depressing"; "something cheerless about the room"; "a moody and uncheerful person"; "an uncheerful place"
unhappy - experiencing or marked by or causing sadness or sorrow or discontent; "unhappy over her departure"; "unhappy with her raise"; "after the argument they lapsed into an unhappy silence"; "had an unhappy time at school"; "the unhappy (or sad) news"; "he looks so sad"
joyless - not experiencing or inspiring joy; "a joyless man"; "a joyless occasion"; "joyless evenings"

cheerless

cheerless

adjective
1. Tending to cause sadness or low spirits:
Translations
كَئيب، مُنْقَبِضُ الصَّدْر
ponurý
glædesløstrist
gleîisnauîur
hüzün vericikasvetli

cheerless

[ˈtʃɪəlɪs] ADJtriste, sombrío

cheerless

[ˈtʃɪərləs] adjsombre, triste

cheerless

adjfreudlos, trüb; persontrübselig, trübsinnig; prospecttrübe, düster, traurig; scenerygrau

cheerless

[ˈtʃɪəlɪs] adj (atmosphere) → triste; (room, place) → desolato/a

cheer

(tʃiə) noun
1. a shout of approval, encouragement or welcome. Three cheers for the Queen!
2. mood. Be of good cheer.
verb
to give a shout of approval etc (to). The crowd cheered the new champion.
ˈcheerful adjective
full of, or causing, happiness. a cheerful smile; cheerful news.
ˈcheerfully adverb
ˈcheerfulness noun
ˈcheerless adjective
gloomy. a cheerless room.
cheers! interjection
1. used as a toast when drinking.
2. cheerio!.
3. thanks!.
ˈcheery adjective
lively and happy.
ˈcheerily adverb
ˈcheeriness noun
cheer up
to make or become (more cheerful). He cheered up when he saw her; The flowers will cheer her up.
References in classic literature ?
THE Dog, as created, had a rigid tail, but after some centuries of a cheerless existence, unappreciated by Man, who made him work for his living, he implored the Creator to endow him with a wag.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
Doubtless it is fancy, but it seems to me now that the remaining distance was made in a chill fog; that I was uncomfortably cold; that the way was longer than ever before, and the town, when we reached it, cheerless, forbidding, and desolate.
She was stopped by a dreadful sound of laughter--the cheerless laughter that is heard among the mad.
Cold and cheerless, the wind beating on our faces, the white seas roaring by, we struggled through the day.
It was a very dubious-looking, nay, a very dark and dismal night, bitingly cold and cheerless.
It was already night, cold and cheerless, the heavens being overcast with clouds which seemed to threaten snow.
He ranged far and wide, and slept but little in the lair that had now become cheerless and miserable.
Everything is awfully grim and cheerless, our weather and our houses and our ways of amusing ourselves.
In fact (not to attribute the whole gloom of sky and earth to the one inauspicious circumstance of Phoebe's departure), an easterly storm had set in, and indefatigably apply itself to the task of making the black roof and walls of the old house look more cheerless than ever before.
Several weeks were consumed in this cheerless manner, during which the inhabitants of the country gradually changed their pursuits from the social and bustling movements of the time of snow to the laborious and domestic engagements of the coming season, The village was no longer thronged with visitors; the trade that had enlivened the shops for several months, began to disappear; the highways lost their shining coats of beaten snow in impassable sloughs, and were deserted by the gay and noisy travellers who, in sleighs, had, during the winter, glided along their windings; and, in short, everything seemed indicative of a mighty change, not only in the earth, but in those who derived their sources of comfort and happiness from its bosom.
The room looked cheerless and dingy to Edna as she entered.