cheesecloth


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cheese·cloth

 (chēz′klôth′, -klŏth′)
n.
A coarse, loosely woven cotton gauze, originally used for wrapping cheese.

cheesecloth

(ˈtʃiːzˌklɒθ)
n
(Textiles) a loosely woven cotton cloth formerly used only for wrapping cheese

cheese•cloth

(ˈtʃizˌklɔθ, -ˌklɒθ)

n.
a lightweight cotton gauze of loose, open plain weave.
[1650–60; first used to wrap cheese]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cheesecloth - a coarse loosely woven cotton gauze; originally used to wrap cheeses
netting, veiling, gauze - a net of transparent fabric with a loose open weave
Translations

cheesecloth

[ˈtʃiːzklɒθ] Nestopilla f

cheesecloth

[ˈtʃiːzˌklɒθ] ntela indiana, garza
References in classic literature ?
The "rich blacksmith's daughter" cast the thought of dotted Swiss behind her, and elected to follow Rebecca in cheesecloth as she had in higher matters; straightway devising costumes that included such drawing of threads, such hemstitching and pin-tucking, such insertions of fine thread tatting that, in order to be finished, Rebecca's dress was given out in sections,--the sash to Hannah, waist and sleeves to Mrs.
Maggie laid a hand on the bosom of her cheesecloth waist.
I was ready to toss it, there was nothing to lose, so in desperation I applied cheesecloth and more paint to obscure what was there.
V-neck cheesecloth tunic, pounds 45, and long gold necklace, pounds 20, French Connection.
If you're a Wild Thing then cheesecloth, flares, platform shoes, Abba records and Gary Glitter albums are your forte.
Wipe the mask clean with a cheesecloth dipped in water and then wipe it dry with cheesecloth.
It's prepared in 11kg rounds and 3kg wheels encased in cheesecloth.
Just be sure to cover them with cheesecloth (or even nylons) so the birds don't get to them first.
Pour into a cheesecloth lined pan and hang to drain for 6-8 hours.
Pour yogurt into a strainer lined with a double thickness of cheesecloth and set in a bowl deep enough that the strainer won't sit in liquid.
Transplanting Halodule and Ruppia using peat pots was more successful than with bare roots or cheesecloth bags.
Instead of a sponge, the application "tool" for ragging can be cheesecloth, old sheets, rags or clothing - almost any absorbent fabric (preferably cotton) that is relatively light in weight.