chemistry


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Related to chemistry: organic chemistry, biology

chem·is·try

 (kĕm′ĭ-strē)
n. pl. chem·is·tries
1. The science of the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and molecular systems.
2. The composition, structure, properties, and reactions of a substance.
3. The elements of a complex entity and their dynamic interrelation: "Now that they had a leader, a restless chemistry possessed the group" (John Updike).
4. Mutual attraction or sympathy; rapport: The chemistry was good between the partners.

chemistry

(ˈkɛmɪstrɪ)
n, pl -tries
1. (Chemistry) the branch of physical science concerned with the composition, properties, and reactions of substances. See also inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry
2. (Chemistry) the composition, properties, and reactions of a particular substance
3. the nature and effects of any complex phenomenon: the chemistry of humour.
4. informal a reaction, taken to be instinctual, between two persons
[C17: from earlier chimistrie, from chimist chemist]

chem•is•try

(ˈkɛm ə stri)

n., pl. -tries.
1. the science that systematically studies the composition, properties, and activity of organic and inorganic substances and various elementary forms of matter.
2. chemical properties, reactions, phenomena, etc.: the chemistry of carbon.
3.
a. sympathetic understanding; rapport.
b. sexual attraction.
4. the constituent elements of something: the chemistry of love.
[1590–1600; earlier chymistry; see chemist, -ry]

chem·is·try

(kĕm′ĭ-strē)
1. The scientific study of the structure, properties, and reactions of the chemical elements and the compounds they form.
2. The composition, structure, properties, and reactions of a substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chemistry - the science of matterchemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
electronegativity, negativity - (chemistry) the tendency of an atom or radical to attract electrons in the formation of an ionic bond
atomic mass, atomic weight, relative atomic mass - (chemistry) the mass of an atom of a chemical element expressed in atomic mass units
molecular weight, relative molecular mass - (chemistry) the sum of the relative atomic masses of the constituent atoms of a molecule
valence, valency - (chemistry) a property of atoms or radicals; their combining power given in terms of the number of hydrogen atoms (or the equivalent)
pH, pH scale - (from potential of Hydrogen) the logarithm of the reciprocal of hydrogen-ion concentration in gram atoms per liter; provides a measure on a scale from 0 to 14 of the acidity or alkalinity of a solution (where 7 is neutral and greater than 7 is more basic and less than 7 is more acidic);
Dalton's law of partial pressures, law of partial pressures, Dalton's law - (chemistry and physics) law stating that the pressure exerted by a mixture of gases equals the sum of the partial pressures of the gases in the mixture; the pressure of a gas in a mixture equals the pressure it would exert if it occupied the same volume alone at the same temperature
distribution law - (chemistry) the total energy in an assembly of molecules is not distributed equally but is distributed around an average value according to a statistical distribution
equilibrium law, law of chemical equilibrium - (chemistry) the principle that (at chemical equilibrium) in a reversible reaction the ratio of the rate of the forward reaction to the rate of the reverse reaction is a constant for that reaction
Henry's law - (chemistry) law formulated by the English chemist William Henry; the amount of a gas that will be absorbed by water increases as the gas pressure increases
law of constant proportion, law of definite proportions - (chemistry) law stating that every pure substance always contains the same elements combined in the same proportions by weight
law of equivalent proportions, law of reciprocal proportions - (chemistry) law stating that the proportions in which two elements separately combine with a third element are also the proportions in which they combine together
Dalton's law, law of multiple proportions - (chemistry) law stating that when two elements can combine to form more than one compound the amounts of one of them that combines with a fixed amount of the other will exhibit a simple multiple relation
law of mass action - (chemistry) the law that states the following principle: the rate of a chemical reaction is directly proportional to the molecular concentrations of the reacting substances
Mendeleev's law, periodic law - (chemistry) the principle that chemical properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic numbers
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
chemoimmunology, immunochemistry - the field of chemistry concerned with chemical processes in immunology (such as chemical studies of antigens and antibodies)
organic chemistry - the chemistry of compounds containing carbon (originally defined as the chemistry of substances produced by living organisms but now extended to substances synthesized artificially)
inorganic chemistry - the chemistry of compounds that do not contain hydrocarbon radicals
physical chemistry - the branch of chemistry dealing with the physical properties of chemical substances
electrochemistry - branch of chemistry that deals with the chemical action of electricity and the production of electricity by chemical reactions
femtochemistry - the branch of chemistry that studies elementary (often very fast) chemical reactions as they occur; the experimental methods are often based on the use of femtosecond laser pulses
geochemistry - the chemistry of the earth's crust
photochemistry - branch of chemistry that deals with the chemical action of light
nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry - the chemistry of radioactive substances
surface chemistry - the branch of chemistry that studies processes occurring at interfaces between phases (especially those between liquid and gas)
atomist theory, atomistic theory, atomic theory, atomism - (chemistry) any theory in which all matter is composed of tiny discrete finite indivisible indestructible particles; "the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus and Epicurus held atomic theories of the universe"
Arrhenius theory of dissociation, theory of dissociation, theory of electrolytic dissociation - (chemistry) theory that describes aqueous solutions in terms of acids (which dissociate to give hydrogen ions) and bases (which dissociate to give hydroxyl ions); the product of an acid and a base is a salt and water
Ostwald's theory of indicators, theory of indicators - (chemistry) the theory that all indicators are either weak acids or weak bases in which the color of the ionized form is different from the color before dissociation
2.chemistry - the chemical composition and properties of a substance or object; "the chemistry of soil"
substance - the real physical matter of which a person or thing consists; "DNA is the substance of our genes"
3.chemistry - the way two individuals relate to each otherchemistry - the way two individuals relate to each other; "their chemistry was wrong from the beginning -- they hated each other"; "a mysterious alchemy brought them together"
social relation - a relation between living organisms (especially between people)

chemistry

noun

Chemistry

Branches of chemistry  analytical chemistry, astrochemistry, biochemistry, chemurgy, cytochemistry, electrochemistry, geochemistry, histochemistry, immunochemistry, inorganic chemistry, kinetics, magnetochemistry, neurochemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry, petrochemistry, phonochemistry, photochemistry, physical chemistry, phytochemistry, radiochemistry, stereochemistry, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, zoochemistry, zymurgy
Chemistry terms  acid, alcohol, alkali, alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, alkane, allotrope, alloy, amino acid, analysis, anion, anode, atom, atomic mass, atomic number, base, boiling point, bond, Brownian motion, carbohydrate, catalyst, cathode, cation, chain, chain reaction, chromatography, combustion, compound, concentrated, condensation, corrosion, covalent bond, crystal, crystallization, diffusion, dilute, distillation, electrode, electrolysis, electron, electrovalency, element, emulsion, equation, ester, ether, evaporation, fat, fatty acid, fermentation, fission, foam, formula, fuel, fusion, gas, halogen, hydrocarbon, hydrolysis, inert, inorganic, insoluble, ion, ionic bond, ionization, isomer, isotope, lanthanide or rare-earth element, liquid, litmus test, melting point, metal, metalloid, mineral, mixture, molarity, mole, molecule, monomer, neutral, neutron, noble gas or inert gas, nonmetal, nucleus, oil, ore, organic, oxidation, periodic table, pH, plastic, polymer, precipitate, proton, radioactivity, reaction, reagent, redox reaction, reduction, salt, saponification, saturated, soap, solid, soluble, solution, solvent, sublimation, substitution reaction, sugar, suspension, synthesis, transition metal, unsaturated, valency, van der Waals forces
Chemists  Philip Abelson (U.S.), William Abney (English), Roger Adams (U.S.), Thomas Andrews (Irish), Svante August Arrhenius (Swedish), Francis William Aston (English), Karl Auer (Austrian), Lambert von Babo (German), Johann Friedrich Wilhelm Adolf von Baeyer (German), Derek Barton (English), Antoine Baumé (French), Ernst Otto Beckmann (German), Friedrich (Karl Rudolph) Bergius (German), James (Whyte) Black (English), Joseph Black (Scottish), Carl Bosch (German), Robert Boyle (Irish), Georg Brandt (Swedish), Herbert Charles Brown (U.S.), Eduard Buchner (German), Robert Wilhelm Bunsen (German), Adolf Frederick Johann Butenandt (German), Melvin Calvin (U.S.), Heinrich Caro (German), Geroge Washington Carver (U.S.), Hamilton Young Castner (U.S.), Henry Cavendish (English), (Louis Marie) Hilaire Bernigaud Chardonnet (French), John Warcup Cornforth (Australian), William Crookes (English), Marie Curie (French), Pierre Curie (French), Henry Dakin (English), John Dalton (English), Humphrey Davy (English), Peter Joseph Wilhelm Debye (Dutch), James Dewar (Scottish), John William Draper (U.S.), Jean-Baptiste André Dumas (French), Manfred Eigen (German), Emil Erlenmeyer (German), Richard Robert Ernst (Swiss), Michael Faraday (English), Emil Hermann Fischer (German), Ernst Otto Fischer (German), Hans Fischer (German), Johan Gadolin (Finnish), Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (French), Moses Gomberg (U.S.), Victor Grignard (French), Samuel Guthrie (U.S.), Fritz Haber (German), Charles Martin Hall (U.S.), Jean Baptiste van Helmont (Flemish), William Henry (English), George von Hevesy (Hungarian), Archibald Vivian Hill (English), Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (English), Robert Hooke (English), (Friedrich) August Kekulé von Stradonitz (German), Petrus Jacobus Kipp (Dutch), Irving Langmuir (U.S.), Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (French), Nicolas Leblanc (French), Willard Frank Libby (U.S.), Justus Liebig (German), John Macadam (Australian), Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleyev (Russian), Ludwig Mond (German), Edward Williams Morley (U.S.), Paul Hermann Müller (Swiss), Robert Sanderson Mulliken (U.S.), Kary Banks Mullis (U.S.), Walther Hermann Nernst (German), John Alexander Newlands (English), Alfred Bernhard Nobel (Swedish), Wilhelm Ostwald (German), Louis Pasteur (French), Linus Carl Pauling (U.S.), Max Ferdinand Perutz (Austrian-British), George Porter (English), Joseph Priestley (English), Joseph Louis Proust (French), William Prout (English), Pierre Joseph Pelletier (French), Jean Félix Piccard (U.S.), Ilya Prigogine (Belgian), William Ramsay (Scottish), Paul Sabatier (French), Karl Wilhelm Scheele (Swedish), Hugo Schiff (German), Glenn Theodore Seaborg (U.S.), Benjamin Silliman (U.S.), James Smithson (English), Frederick Soddy (English), Ernest Solvay (Belgian), Soren Peter Lauritz Sorensen (Danish), Joseph Wilson Swan (English), Albert von Nagyrapolt Szent-Gyorgyi (Hungarian-American), Henry Tizard (English), Alexander Robert Todd (Scottish), Harold Clayton Urey (U.S.), Jacobus Hendricus van't Hoff (Dutch), Otto Heinrich Warburg (German), Alfred Werner (Swiss), Friedrich Wöhler (German), R(obert) B(urns) Woodward (U.S.), Peter Woulfe (English), Carl Ziegler (German), Richard Adolf Zsigmondy (German)
Translations
chemieskeikunde
كيمياءكِيمياء
chemie
kemi
keemiakeemia-kemo-
kemiavetovoima
kemija
kémia
efnafræîi
化学
화학
chemijachemikalaschemikascheminisvaistinė
ķīmija
chémia
kemija
kemikemi-personkemi
วิชาเคมี
ngành hóa học

chemistry

[ˈkemɪstrɪ]
A. Nquímica f
the chemistry between them is right (fig) → están muy compenetrados
B. CPD chemistry laboratory Nlaboratorio m de química
chemistry set Njuego m de química

chemistry

[ˈkɛmɪstri]
n (= science) → chimie f
modif [lab, teacher, lesson] → de chimie
the chemistry lab → le laboratoire de chimie

chemistry

n
Chemie f; (= chemical make-up)chemische Zusammensetzung; chemistry setChemiebaukasten m
(fig)Verträglichkeit f; the good chemistry between themihre gute Verträglichkeit; the chemistry between us was perfectwir haben uns sofort vertragen, es hat sofort zwischen uns gefunkt (inf); the chemistry’s all wrong (between us)wir sind einfach zu verschieden; the chemistry of physical attraction/of lovedas Kräftespiel der körperlichen Anziehung/in der Liebe

chemistry

[ˈkɛmɪstrɪ] nchimica

chemistry

(ˈkemistri) noun
(the science that deals with) the nature of substances and the ways in which they act on, or combine with, each other. Chemistry was his favourite subject; the chemistry of the blood.
ˈchemical adjective
of chemistry. a chemical reaction.
noun
a substance used in or obtained by a chemical process. Some chemicals give off harmful fumes.
ˈchemist noun
1. a scientist who studies or works in chemistry. an industrial chemist.
2. (American ˈdruggist) a person who makes up and sells medicines and usually also soap, make-up etc.
3. a chemist's shop. Where is the nearest chemist?

chemistry

كِيمياء chemie kemi Chemie χημεία química kemia chimie kemija chimica 化学 화학 scheikunde kjemi chemia química химия kemi วิชาเคมี kimya ngành hóa học 化学

chem·is·try

n. química, ciencia que estudia los elementos, estructura y propiedades de las sustancias y las transformaciones que éstas sufren.

chemistry

n química
References in classic literature ?
But when Steelkilt made known his determination still to lead them to the last, they in some way, by some subtle chemistry of villany, mixed their before secret treacheries together; and when their leader fell into a doze, verbally opened their souls to each other in three sentences; and bound the sleeper with cords, and gagged him with cords; and shrieked out for the Captain at midnight.
Jonas had told them how the meat that was taken out of pickle would often be found sour, and how they would rub it up with soda to take away the smell, and sell it to be eaten on free-lunch counters; also of all the miracles of chemistry which they performed, giving to any sort of meat, fresh or salted, whole or chopped, any color and any flavor and any odor they chose.
These farms which I have myself surveyed, these bounds which I have set up, appear dimly still as through a mist; but they have no chemistry to fix them; they fade from the surface of the glass, and the picture which the painter painted stands out dimly from beneath.
This change had a great influence in bringing Camilla's chemistry to a sudden end.
Indeed, he was still devoted to the study of chemistry, and had a laboratory of his own in which he used to shut himself up all day long, greatly to the annoyance of his mother, who had set her heart on his standing for Parliament and had a vague idea that a chemist was a person who made up prescriptions.
It will be his aim to know the subtle chemistry of public opinion, and to adapt the telephone service to the shifting moods and necessities of the times.
Subjection of Nature's forces to man, machinery, application of chemistry to industry and agriculture, steam-navigation, railways, electric telegraphs, clearing of whole continents for cultivation, canalisation of rivers, whole populations conjured out of the ground -- what earlier century had even a presentiment that such productive forces slumbered in the lap of social labour?
My days I devote to reading and to experiments in chemistry, and I spend many of the clear nights in the study of astronomy.
Then, going up a broad staircase, we came to what may once have been a gallery of technical chemistry.
A few words he let fall showed them that he was no stranger to the sciences, and he seemed much occupied with chemistry.
He was from beyond the sea, a Doctor Cacaphodel, who had wilted and dried himself into a mummy by continually stooping over charcoal furnaces, and inhaling unwholesome fumes during his researches in chemistry and alchemy.
Botany variable, geology profound as regards the mud-stains from any region within fifty miles of town, chemistry eccentric, anatomy unsystematic, sensational literature and crime records unique, violin-player, boxer, swordsman, lawyer, and self-poisoner by cocaine and tobacco.