chest voice


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chest voice

or

chest register

n
(Music, other) a voice of the lowest speaking or singing register. Compare head voice
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chest voice - the lower ranges of the voice in speaking or singing
register - (music) the timbre that is characteristic of a certain range and manner of production of the human voice or of different pipe organ stops or of different musical instruments
References in classic literature ?
I found him sitting there," went on Fyne impressively in his effortless, grave chest voice, "drafting his will.
I flip from my chest voice to my head voice really fast and Regina does that.
For the first time, the voice dropped all the way to C3 in chest voice.
This point, which aligns with historical sources, supports Feldman's conclusion that a castrato singing in high chest voice (f/g-c1/e1) would be able to achieve the singer's formant (a "resonance in the 2,500-4,400 hertz region that allows a voice to project over an orchestra") while maintaining a relaxed, accessible means of production, or, as Feldman terms it, without "pushing" the voice (p.
Florence-born countertenor Filippo Mineccia, in the alto role of Ottone, sang his Act I "Lusinghiera mia speranza" ardently, but had to switch to chest voice momentarily in low reaches, and Finnish bass Mika Kares, a suitably stentorian Claudio overall, could not always project his lowest notes.
You sing in both the head and chest voice and there are a lot of "ooos" involved.
In heavier, more demanding songs, her chest voice was strong, its tone bright and youthful.
Dr Pawley said: "God Save the Queen doesn't invite high chest voice singing for most people's voices, and it lacks a real hook or climax where people feel compelled to join in and belt it out.
To spare you the rudiments of laryngeal anatomy and physiology with which the pedagogically uninitiated may not be familiar, TAD equates with the ordinario in the male voice, chest voice in the female, TAD being the cross-gender term, based on laryngeal muscular activity, rather than societal norms or subjective resonance sensations.
The head voice is used for excitement (children use it all the time), the chest voice expresses authority, the voice of the heart is saved for feelings and is very difficult to access if you're not connected to the feeling and finally, the gut voice conveys your deepest, truest beliefs.
When Charlotte and I started working together, she told me she was struggling to differentiate between her chest voice and her head voice, so I focused on writing songs that would really suit her range.
While using a deep chest voice at least as strong as those of the Ensemble Organum's Machaut Mass, the delivery of Catalan singer Gisela Bellsola is, at least in the context of this piece, much more successful; and whatever the historical justification for alternating her impassioned rendition of the verses over a vocal drone with a 16th-century refrain in four voices, the effect is powerfully evocative.