chestnut blight


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to chestnut blight: Dutch elm disease

chestnut blight

n.
A disease of chestnut trees caused by a fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica) that is especially destructive to the American chestnut, characterized by cankers that kill the branches and trunk.

chest′nut blight`



n.
a disease of chestnut trees caused by a fungus, Endothia parasitica, characterized by bark lesions that eventually girdle the trunk and kill the tree.
[1905–10, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chestnut blight - a disease of American chestnut trees
blight - any plant disease resulting in withering without rotting
References in periodicals archive ?
Flight 93 staff have partnered with scientists and foresters from the American Chestnut Foundation to plant seedlings they hope will be the first in more than a century to withstand an invasive fungus known as the chestnut blight.
Once a common sight, reigning over 200 million acres of eastern woodlands from Maine to Florida, the American chestnut tree disappeared from this area during the first half of the 20th century because of a lethal fungus infestation known as the chestnut blight.
Tree health is crucial to the countryside and the rural economy, and we will continue to work closely with Defra to protect our trees from sweet chestnut blight, Chalara, Phytophthora and other pests and diseases.
Environment Secretary Owen Paterson announced the ban after a six-week consultation, which received "overwhelming support" for stopping imports from areas such as France which are affected by sweet chestnut blight.
But with aspirations of a convenient cash crop came a fungus disease called chestnut blight, an organism that crept under their split bark, slipped into their vascular system and triggered cankers.
Chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica) was introduced into the United States around 1904.
Within a few decades, the chestnut blight killed up to three billion American chestnut trees on over 200 million acres of woodland.
If it becomes established in the United States, the invasive insect has the potential to cause more damage than Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight, and the gypsy moth combined--destroying millions of acres of our hardwoods, including national forests and parks and even our own backyard trees.
At one time, woodrats were found in 41 Pennsylvania counties, but the 20th century's American chestnut blight and gypsy moth invasion - other imports from Asia - and substantial changes in land use have conspired to create huge habitat deficiencies and insurmountable barriers in the woodrat's world.
At the beginning of the last century, the chestnut blight, caused by a fungus, rapidly spread throughout the American chestnut's natural range, which extended from southern New England and New York southwest to Alabama.
Recent additions to the collections include seven species of fungi in the chestnut blight group that were discovered and described in the past few years.
The outbreak of chestnut blight fungus (Cryphonectria parasitica) from imported chestnut stock was first observed in New York and spread like wild-fire.