cheverel

cheverel

(ˈtʃɛvərəl)
n
1. (Tanning)
a. a type of leather made from kidskin or goatskin
b. (as modifier): a cheverel glove.
2. (Tanning) (as modifier): a cheverel glove.
References in periodicals archive ?
Visitors can access A&E reception via the clearly signed path or the signed entrances in the main corridor accessed from the Cheverel Entrance.
In "Mr Gilfil's Love Story" the reader is presented with Eoxholm, a landscape lacking any pretension to gentility such as that exhibited by Cheverel Manor; it instead "conforms to the reassuring Gainsborough or Stubbs ideal of well-fed, clean, contented country people" (87), with Dorcas and her children all red chubby cheeks, signifying their harmony with the rustic idyll.
Traducido por Dacosta Cheverel y, Jose y Flores Palacios, Fatima.
So wrote the novelist, George Eliot, of Cheverel Manor in Mr Gilfil's Love Story, first published in 1857.
The relation between the heroine and her guardians is likewise parallel, for in each narrative, the lord and lady of the estate are benign but imperceptive figures; Austen's heavy Sir Thomas and her passive sofa-bound Lady Bertram are but slightly altered in Eliot's portrayals of Sir Christopher and Lady Chevereh Both Lady Bertram and Lady Cheverel are chiefly distinguished by their useless embroidery-work, much of which they require Fanny and Caterina in their turns to finish for them.
A sentence is but a cheverel glove to a good wit, how quickly the wrong side may be turned outward" (3.
Mrs Talbott, who lived in Cheverel Place, Nuneaton, died the following day.
For example Arbury Hall becomes Cheverel Manor in Mr Gilfil's Love-Story and Griff House (another Arbury estate property) was used in The Mill on the Floss.
She immortalised the mansion as Cheverel Manor in her short stories Scenes Of Clerical Life.
The hall and the estate were the inspiration for Cheverel Manor in her earliest stories, Tales of Clerical Life where it is described as a 'castellated house of grey--tinted stone' with 'architectural beauty like a cathedral' and carved ceilings 'like petrified lace-work'.
Police say the drugs were snatched from the car of a health worker who was visiting the Cheverel Nursing Home, in Cheverel Place.
The latter-day Queen Victoria and her escort, "Mr Brown", played by Dorothy and Mike King, were accompanied on their visit by Sir Christopher and Lady Henrietta Cheverel, alias Helen and Clive Woodward, who came to inspect the heraldic shield of the Newdegate family and to listen to readings from George Eliot's Scenes of Clerical Life.