chickweed


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Related to chickweed: Stellaria media

chick·weed

 (chĭk′wēd′)
n.
Any of various herbs of the genera Cerastium and Stellaria of the pink family, especially S. media, a cosmopolitan weed having small white flowers with deeply notched petals.

[So called because it is eaten by chickens.]

chickweed

(ˈtʃɪkˌwiːd)
n
1. (Plants) any of various caryophyllaceous plants of the genus Stellaria, esp S. media, a common garden weed with small white flowers
2. (Plants) mouse-ear chickweed any of various similar and related plants of the genus Cerastium

chick•weed

(ˈtʃɪkˌwid)

n.
any of various plants of the genera Stellaria and Cerastium, of the pink family, as S. media, a common Old World weed whose leaves and seeds are relished by birds.
[1325–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chickweed - any of various plants of the genus Stellariachickweed - any of various plants of the genus Stellaria
genus Stellaria, Stellaria - common chickweed; stitchwort
common chickweed, Stellaria media - a common low-growing annual garden weed with small white flowers; cosmopolitan; so-called because it is eaten by chickens
greater stitchwort, starwort, Stellaria holostea, stitchwort - low-growing north temperate herb having small white star-shaped flowers; named for its alleged ability to ease sharp pains in the side
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.chickweed - any of various plants related to the common chickweedchickweed - any of various plants related to the common chickweed
Cerastium, genus Cerastium - mouse-eared chickweed
Cerastium arvense, field chickweed, field mouse-ear - densely tufted perennial chickweed of north temperate zone
Cerastium tomentosum, love-in-a-mist, snow-in-summer - chickweed with hairy silver-grey leaves and rather large white flowers
Alpine mouse-ear, Arctic mouse-ear, Cerastium alpinum - widespread in the Arctic and on mountains in Europe
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations
ptačinec
mouron blanc
hoornbloemmuur

chickweed

[ˈtʃɪkwiːd] Npamplina f

chickweed

[ˈtʃɪkwiːd] nmouron m des oiseaux

chickweed

[ˈtʃɪkˌwiːd] n (Bot) → centonchio

chickweed

n (bot) pamplina, alsine m
References in classic literature ?
Blathers; 'that was done by Conkey Chickweed, that was.
This here Conkey Chickweed, miss, kept a public-house over Battlebridge way, and he had a cellar, where a good many young lords went to see cock-fighting, and badger-drawing, and that; and a wery intellectural manner the sports was conducted in, for I've seen
Chickweed in apprehending the man as robbed his house.
Beth had old-fashioned fragrant flowers in her garden, sweet peas and mignonette, larkspur, pinks, pansies, and southernwood, with chickweed for the birds and catnip for the pussies.
At home, I even leave an area in the veggie patch to grow chickweed, which is particularly beneficial for my hens
Infused herbal oils may be made from dried arnica flowers, bergamot leaves and flowers, calendula flowers, cayenne peppers, cannabis leaves and flowers, chickweed leaves and flowers, comfrey leaves, ginger roots, helichrysum flowers, mullein leaves, turmeric roots, and virtually any herb containing essential oils (such as rosemary, thyme, and lavender).
5: "collection and transportation of waste, cleaning and maintenance of streets and other public places within the region" asparuhovo "and town hall" chickweed "in varna municipality.
January harvest includes chickweed, hickory nuts, black walnuts and sassafras root.
Very common in Florida lawns, chickweed forms dense mats with small symmetrically placed leaves on thin stringy stems.
Blair, who founded a nonprofit focusing on personal health and wildlands and teaches at retreats, festivals, and educational and healing events, highlights 13 foraging and edible weeds from around the world that can be sources of food: dandelion, mallow, purslane, plantain, thistle, amaranth, dock, mustard, grass, chickweed, clover, lambsquarter, and knotweed, chosen because of their beneficial characteristics and wide availability.
For those who doubt that immortality is possible in the natural order of things, Gene Logsdon, an Ohio farmer who has done a lot of hard hoeing and hard thinking in his eighty years, nominates chickweed and pigweed as plausible candidates for the Great Forever After.
It is common to discover chickweed in full bloom at Christmastime.