chiefess


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chief·ess

 (chē′fĭs)
n.
A woman chief, especially in traditional Hawaiian society.

[chief + -ess.]

chiefess

(ˈtʃiːfɛs)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a chief who is female
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Coutras had gone one day to Taravao in order to see an old chiefess who was ill, and he gave a vivid picture of the obese old lady, lying in a huge bed, smoking cigarettes, and surrounded by a crowd of dark-skinned retainers.
I was down at Taravao to see the chiefess, and Ata sent for me to see you.
More than two years passed before I went to Taravao again, and then it was once more to see the old chiefess.
I decided to see Strickland, and when I had finished with the chiefess asked for a boy to show me the way.
The eruption threatened to destroy the town of Hilo until a royal Hawaiian chiefess visited the active flow and interceded with Pele to spare the city.
In her decolonizing essay, Lani Cupchoy reconstructs the history of the Hawaiian warrior woman Chiefess Manono, juxtaposing the nineteenth-century colonial script with stories still being told by native elders in the present day.
It was collaboration between the University of Hawaii Marine Option program, a local NGO, and science teachers from the Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, Lihue, Kauai, Hawaii, USA.
Julia's grandmother, the chiefess Ahia, married Captain George Beckley, one of "Kamehameha's haoles" and the first commander of the Fort of Honolulu, in a traditional Hawaiian ceremony (41) The couple were devoted; Ahia sailed with her husband on many of his voyages and was thought to be the first ali'i wahine to visit Canton.
Purea was a chiefess of Tahiti's southern district of Papara and although she was ambitious for greater power, at this stage neither she nor any other chief possessed rule over the island as a whole.
Zambucka K, The High Chiefess Ruth Keelikolani, Honolulu: Green Glass Productions, 1992
She then ordered the new chief, Liholiho, to join her and his mother, the sacred chiefess Kapi'olani, in disbanding the existent Maoli religious system.
The road has been named Ala Kalanikaumaka to honor Hawaii's late Queen Emma (trans: The Chiefess to whom everyone looks.