chieftain


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chief·tain

 (chēf′tən)
n.
The leader or head of a group, especially of a clan or tribe.

[Middle English cheftain, from Old French chevetain, from Late Latin capitāneus, from Latin caput, head; see kaput- in Indo-European roots.]

chief′tain·cy n.
chief′tain·ship′ n.

chieftain

(ˈtʃiːftən; -tɪn)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the head or leader of a tribe or clan
2. the chief of a group of people
[C14: from Old French chevetaine, from Late Latin capitāneus commander; see captain]
ˈchieftaincy, ˈchieftainˌship n

chief•tain

(ˈtʃif tən)

n.
1. the chief of a clan or a tribe.
2. a leader of a group, band, etc.: the robbers' chieftain.
[1275–1325; Middle English cheftayne, variant of chevetaine < Old French < Late Latin capitāneus captain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chieftain - the leader of a group of people; "a captain of industry"
leader - a person who rules or guides or inspires others
2.chieftain - the head of a tribe or clanchieftain - the head of a tribe or clan    
leader - a person who rules or guides or inspires others
Indian chief, Indian chieftain - the leader of a group of Native Americans
pendragon - the supreme war chief of the ancient Britons

chieftain

noun
One who is highest in rank or authority:
Slang: honcho.
Translations
زَعيمُ القَبيلَه
náčelník
høvding
törzsfõnök
höfîingi
náčelník
kabile reisi

chieftain

[ˈtʃiːftən] Njefe/a m/f, cacique m (LAm)

chieftain

[ˈtʃiːftən] nchef m

chieftain

n (of tribe)Häuptling m; (of clan)Oberhaupt nt, → Älteste(r) m; (of robber band)Hauptmann m; the village chieftainder Dorfälteste

chieftain

[ˈtʃiːftən] ncapo tribù

chief

(tʃiːf) adjective
greatest in importance etc. the chief cause of disease.
noun
the head of a clan or tribe, or a department, business etc.
ˈchiefly adverb
mainly. She became ill chiefly because she did not eat enough.
ˌchief eˈxecutive ˌofficer noun
(also CEO) the president of a large company.
ˈchieftain (-tən) noun
the head of a clan, tribe etc.
References in classic literature ?
But all men of worship said it was merry to be under such a chieftain that would put his person in adventure as other poor knights did.
The walls of the apartment were so ill finished and so full of crevices, that the rich hangings shook in the night blast, and, in despite of a sort of screen intended to protect them from the wind, the flame of the torches streamed sideways into the air, like the unfurled pennon of a chieftain.
The barbarian chieftain, who defended his country against the Roman invasion, driven to the remotest extremity of Britain, and stimulating his followers to battle by all that has power of persuasion upon the human heart, concluded his persuasion by an appeal to these irresistible feelings: "Think of your forefathers and of your posterity.
There was a common head, chieftain, or sovereign, whose authority extended over the whole nation; and a number of subordinate vassals, or feudatories, who had large portions of land allotted to them, and numerous trains of INFERIOR vassals or retainers, who occupied and cultivated that land upon the tenure of fealty or obedience, to the persons of whom they held it.
The chieftain rose to his feet and uttered the name of my escort who, in turn, halted and repeated the name of the ruler followed by his title.
So he commenced to bargain, and in the end the person of Meriem passed from the possession of the black chieftain into that of the two Swedes in consideration of six yards of Amerikan, three empty brass cartridge shells and a shiny, new jack knife from New Jersey.
Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating up the estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must not expect others to think well of them.
At the request of the Crow chieftain the two parties encamped together, and passed the residue of the day in company.
Whenever he met a king or chieftain, he stood by him and spoke him fairly.
Aye, paddle away, brave chieftain, to the land of spirits
Every partner who had charge of an interior post, and a score of retainers at his Command, felt like the chieftain of a Highland clan, and was almost as important in the eyes of his dependents as of himself.
Shouldering his way through the throng of warriors, the mighty chieftain advanced toward me.