childness


Related to childness: childishness, unintentionally

childness

(ˈtʃaɪldnəs)
n
the nature or character of a child
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps" books written for children (as distinct from young adult literature), carry inherently a multiplicity of images or what Hollindale (1997) calls' 'signs 'of childness '--the quality of being a child.
I think the childness in children's literature is related to our souls.
Cardinal James Gibbons, the senior Roman Catholic prelate in the United States, who also wanted universal military training, stated in words reminiscent of a statement made by Progressive philosopher William James, who wanted to "get the childness knocked out of" young conscripts, "[univeral military training will] instill into them the spirit of obedience to lawful authority, a virtue too often disregarded in our land of freedom.
Such an example would be Peter Hollindale's Signs of Childness in Children's Books, (7) which opens with the claim to be a `clarification' of the meanings that are brought into play when the word `child' is employed.
So far, so good; but the subsequent analysis provided by Signs of Childness returns us to a `real' that is presumed known:
We are, in a sense, all the children of our society, if we define childness in the sense of a continuing need to learn.
His childness might be at the root of his sense of fun, but it was Connolly's adult humour that gained him a reputation as the crude comedian, the Big Yin.