chiliagon


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chiliagon

(ˈkɪlɪəˌɡɒn)
n
a thousand-sided polygon
References in periodicals archive ?
49) This rhetorical question is reminiscent of Rene Descartes's own regarding his inability to imagine what he can nevertheless clearly conceive, namely, a chiliagon.
But if I want to think of a chiliagon, although I understand that it is a figure consisting of a thousand sides just as well as I understand the triangle to be a three-sided figure, I do not in the same way imagine the thousand sides or see them as if they were present before me.
In distinguishing between pure intellection and imagination, Descartes uses the example of the chiliagon to illustrate how the mind conceives of those things that are unrepresentable to the imagination.
But once I have found the number, I know the given polygon's nature and properties very well, insofar as they are those of a chiliagon.
There is, perhaps, some intuitive sense in which the heap, and the chiliagon, are more readily understood when one ascertains the number involved, for then, as Leibniz suggests, certain properties can be inferred on the basis of this information.