Chinaman

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Chi·na·man

 (chī′nə-mən)
n. Offensive
A Chinese man.

Chinaman

(ˈtʃaɪnəmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Peoples) archaic or derogatory a native or inhabitant of China
2. (Cricket) (often not capital) cricket a ball bowled by a left-handed bowler to a right-handed batsman that spins from off to leg

Chi•na•man

(ˈtʃaɪ nə mən)

n., pl. -men.
Older Use: Usually Offensive. (a term used to refer to a Chinese.)
Idioms:
a Chinaman's chance, Usually Offensive. the slightest chance.
[1765–75]
usage: Definition 1 is rarely used today. Definition 1 as well as the expression a Chinaman's chance are usually perceived as insulting to the Chinese.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Chinaman - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Chinese descent
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
ethnic slur - a slur on someone's race or language
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
Chinese - a native or inhabitant of Communist China or of Nationalist China
2.Chinaman - a ball bowled by a left-handed bowler to a right-handed batsman that spins from off to leg
bowling - (cricket) the act of delivering a cricket ball to the batsman
Translations
kinamann

Chinaman

(o.f.) [ˈtʃaɪnəmən] N (Chinamen (pl)) (pej in US) → chino m
References in classic literature ?
These desperate ones were the dregs of the city's cesspools, wretches who hid at night in the rain-soaked cellars of old ramshackle tenements, in "stale-beer dives" and opium joints, with abandoned women in the last stages of the harlot's progress--women who had been kept by Chinamen and turned away at last to die.
I saw to what extent the people among whom I lived could be trusted as good neighbors and friends; that their friendship was for summer weather only; that they did not greatly propose to do right; that they were a distinct race from me by their prejudices and superstitions, as the Chinamen and Malays are that in their sacrifices to humanity they ran no risks, not even to their property; that after all they were not so noble but they treated the thief as he had treated them, and hoped, by a certain outward observance and a few prayers, and by walking in a particular straight through useless path from time to time, to save their souls.
I saw Esquimaux there, and Tartars, Negroes, Chinamen - people from everywhere.
You and I are paupers in comparison with the great capitalists of that country, where the laborers fight for bones with the Chinamen, like dogs.
In China, as I daresay you know, the Emperor is a Chinaman, and all his courtiers are also Chinamen.
The Rangoon had a large quota of passengers, many of whom disembarked at Singapore, among them a number of Indians, Ceylonese, Chinamen, Malays, and Portuguese, mostly second-class travellers.
at the end of George Street, where the cheap eating-houses (sixpence a meal) were kept by Chinamen (Sun-kum-on's was not bad), is heard at regular intervals.
Playing us for Chinamen because we are strangers and trying to learn
Here they spent nearly a month, during which time Professor Maxon was daily engaged in interviewing officials, English residents and a motley horde of Malays and Chinamen.
I, for one, don't want to be drowned for the sake of a handful of dirty Chinamen.
Charlie winked rapturously at her behind his mother's fan; Mac openly pointed to the tall figure beside her; Jamie stared fixedly over the back of his pew, till Rose thought his round eyes would drop out of his head; George fell over a stool and dropped three books in his excitement; Will drew sailors and Chinamen on his clean cuffs, and displayed them, to Rose's great tribulation; Steve nearly upset the whole party by burning his nose with salts, as he pretended to be overcome by his joy; even dignified Archie disgraced himself by writing in his hymn book, "Isn't he blue and brown?
for his unchristian spirit, but he merely explained that there was nothing about Chinamen in the New Testament, and strode away to wreak his displeasure upon his dog, which also, I suppose, the inspired scribes had overlooked.