chine


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

chine

 (chīn)
n.
1.
a. The backbone or spine, especially of an animal.
b. A cut of meat containing part of the backbone.
2. A ridge or crest.
3. Nautical The line of intersection between the side and bottom of a flatbottom or V-bottom boat.
tr.v. chined, chin·ing, chines
To cut (a carcass, for example) through the spine, as when butchering.

[Middle English, from Old French eschine, of Germanic origin; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]

chine

(tʃaɪn)
n
1. (Anatomy) the backbone
2. (Cookery) the backbone of an animal with adjoining meat, cut for cooking
3. (Physical Geography) a ridge or crest of land
4. (Nautical Terms) (in some boats) a corner-like intersection where the bottom meets the side
vb
(Cookery) (tr) to cut (meat) along or across the backbone
[C14: from Old French eschine, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German scina needle, shinbone; see shin1]

chine

(tʃaɪn)
n
(Brewing) another word for chime2

chine

(tʃaɪn)
n
(Geological Science) dialect Southern English a deep fissure in the wall of a cliff
[Old English cīnan to crack]

chiné

(ˈʃiːneɪ)
adj
(Textiles) textiles having a mottled pattern
[C19: from French chiner to make in the Chinese fashion, from Chine China]

chine

(tʃaɪn)

n., v. chined, chin•ing. n.
1. the backbone or spine, esp. of an animal.
2. the angular intersection of the bottom and sides of a boat.
v.t.
3. (in butchering) to sever the backbone of.
[1250–1300; Middle English eschine < Old French < Germanic. See shin1]

chine


Past participle: chined
Gerund: chining

Imperative
chine
chine
Present
I chine
you chine
he/she/it chines
we chine
you chine
they chine
Preterite
I chined
you chined
he/she/it chined
we chined
you chined
they chined
Present Continuous
I am chining
you are chining
he/she/it is chining
we are chining
you are chining
they are chining
Present Perfect
I have chined
you have chined
he/she/it has chined
we have chined
you have chined
they have chined
Past Continuous
I was chining
you were chining
he/she/it was chining
we were chining
you were chining
they were chining
Past Perfect
I had chined
you had chined
he/she/it had chined
we had chined
you had chined
they had chined
Future
I will chine
you will chine
he/she/it will chine
we will chine
you will chine
they will chine
Future Perfect
I will have chined
you will have chined
he/she/it will have chined
we will have chined
you will have chined
they will have chined
Future Continuous
I will be chining
you will be chining
he/she/it will be chining
we will be chining
you will be chining
they will be chining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chining
you have been chining
he/she/it has been chining
we have been chining
you have been chining
they have been chining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chining
you will have been chining
he/she/it will have been chining
we will have been chining
you will have been chining
they will have been chining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chining
you had been chining
he/she/it had been chining
we had been chining
you had been chining
they had been chining
Conditional
I would chine
you would chine
he/she/it would chine
we would chine
you would chine
they would chine
Past Conditional
I would have chined
you would have chined
he/she/it would have chined
we would have chined
you would have chined
they would have chined

chine

To separate the backbone from the ribs in a joint of meat.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chine - cut of meat or fish including at least part of the backbone
cut of meat, cut - a piece of meat that has been cut from an animal carcass
2.chine - backbone of an animal
spinal column, spine, vertebral column, rachis, backbone, back - the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord; "the fall broke his back"
Verb1.chine - cut through the backbone of an animal
butcher, slaughter - kill (animals) usually for food consumption; "They slaughtered their only goat to survive the winter"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Just at the door the captain aimed at the fugitive one last tremendous cut, which would certainly have split him to the chine had it not been intercepted by our big signboard of Admiral Benbow.
The cold veal, the fresh lettuces, and the stuffed chine might well look tempting to hungry men who had dined at half-past twelve o'clock.
Poyser, when she was dispensing her slices of stuffed chine.
It spoils the flavour o' the chine, to my thinking.
Why, it's pretty near a three-week since y' had your supper with us; and the missis has got one of her rare stuffed chines.
Patroclus did as his comrade bade him; he set the chopping-block in front of the fire, and on it he laid the loin of a sheep, the loin also of a goat, and the chine of a fat hog.
Between these dishes and the turkeys stood, on the one side, a prodigious chine of roasted bear’s meat, and on the other a boiled leg of delicious mutton.
Then he went on from task to task: first he cut up the rich, fatted meat, and pierced it with wooden spits, and roasted flesh and the honourable chine and the paunch full of dark blood all together.
The consequence of this was an excellent cold chine being produced upon the table, upon which not only Partridge, but Jones himself, made a very hearty breakfast, though the latter began to grow again uneasy, as the people of the house could give him no fresh information concerning Sophia.
Osgood's, at the Orchards, and they found hams and chines uncut, pork-pies with the scent of the fire in them, spun butter in all its freshness--everything, in fact, that appetites at leisure could desire, in perhaps greater perfection, though not in greater abundance, than at Squire Cass's.
I began to compare the things to human ma- chines, to ask myself for the first time in my life how an ironclad or a steam engine would seem to an intelligent lower animal.
Again, there is another manner in which, according to Homer, brave youths should be honoured; for he tells how Ajax, after he had distinguished himself in battle, was rewarded with long chines, which seems to be a compliment appropriate to a hero in the flower of his age, being not only a tribute of honour but also a very strengthening thing.