chips


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chip 1

 (chĭp)
n.
1. A small broken or cut off piece, as of wood, stone, or glass.
2. A crack or flaw caused by the removal of a small piece.
3.
a. A small disk or counter used in poker and other games to represent money.
b. chips Slang Money.
4. A small, thin piece of semiconductor bearing numerous circuits integrated into its substrate. A chip smaller than a fingernail can hold millions of circuits. Most of a computer's circuitry is built from chips mounted on circuit boards. Also called microchip.
5.
a. A thin, usually fried slice of food, especially a potato chip: ate chips with her sandwich.
b. A very small piece of food or candy: made cookies with chocolate chips.
c. chips Chiefly British French fries.
6. Wood, palm leaves, straw, or similar material cut and dried for weaving.
7. A fragment of dried animal dung used as fuel.
8. Something worthless.
9. Sports A chip shot.
v. chipped, chip·ping, chips
v.tr.
1. To chop or cut with an axe or other implement.
2.
a. To break a small piece from: chip a tooth.
b. To break or cut off (a small piece): chip ice from the window.
3. To shape or carve by cutting or chopping: chipped her name in the stone.
v.intr.
1. To become broken off into small pieces.
2. Sports To make a chip shot in golf.
Phrasal Verbs:
chip away
To reduce or make progress on something incrementally: We chipped away until the problem was solved.
chip in
1. To contribute money or labor: We all chipped in for beer.
2. To interrupt with comments; interject.
3. To put up chips or money as one's bet in poker and other games.
Idioms:
chip off the old block
A child whose appearance or character closely resembles that of one or the other parent.
chip on (one's) shoulder
A habitually hostile or combative attitude.
when the chips are down
At a critical or difficult time.

[Middle English, from Old English cyp, beam, from Latin cippus.]

chip 2

 (chĭp)
intr.v. chipped, chip·ping, chips
To cheep, as a bird.

[Imitative.]

chip n.

chip 3

 (chĭp)
n. Sports
A trick method of throwing one's opponent in wrestling.

[Origin unknown.]

chips

In British English, chips are long, thin pieces of potato that are fried in oil and eaten hot. Pieces of potato like these are called fries or french fries in American English.

We had fish and chips for dinner.
They went to a restaurant near the Capitol for a steak and fries.

In American English, chips or potato chips are very thin slices of potato that have been fried until they are hard and crunchy and are eaten cold. Pieces of potato like these are called crisps in British English.

She ate a large bag of potato chips.
I bought a packet of crisps and a drink.

Chips made from foods other than potatoes usually have that word first.

There was a bowl of tortilla chips and salsa on the table.

chips

french fries
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chips - strips of potato fried in deep fatchips - strips of potato fried in deep fat  
Irish potato, murphy, potato, spud, tater, white potato - an edible tuber native to South America; a staple food of Ireland
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations
hranolky
chips
ranskalaiset perunatsipsiperunalastu
čipspomfrit
フライドポテト
감자칩
pommes frites
มันฝรั่งทอด
khoai tây rán

chips

بَطَاطِس مَقْلِيَّة hranolky chips Pommes τηγανητές πατάτες papa frita, patatas fritas ranskalaiset perunat frites čips patate fritte フライドポテト 감자칩 chips pommes frites frytki batata frita картофель-фри pommes frites มันฝรั่งทอด kızarmış patates khoai tây rán 薯条
References in classic literature ?
It was full of little brown chips that looked like the shavings of some root.
About riding to the mill behind Gluglu; fishing back in the lake with their Uncle Jasper; picking pecans with Lidie's little black brood, and hauling chips in their express wagon.
All around were scattered shavings, chips, shingles, and broken halves of bricks; these, together with the lately turned earth, on which the grass had not begun to grow, contributed to the impression of strangeness and novelty proper to a house that had yet its place to make among men's daily interests.
The universe is finished; the copestone is on, and the chips were carted off a million years ago.
Tom saw abundance of men,--great, burly, gruff men; little, chirping, dried men; long-favored, lank, hard men; and every variety of stubbed-looking, commonplace men, who pick up their fellow-men as one picks up chips, putting them into the fire or a basket with equal unconcern, according to their convenience; but he saw no St.
At such a time it is sound judgment to put on a bold face and play your hand for a hundred times what it is worth; forty-nine times out of fifty nobody dares to "call," and you rake in the chips.
When we had wound down toward the valley until we were about on the last spiral of the corkscrew, Harris's hat blew over the last remaining bit of precipice--a small cliff a hundred or hundred and fifty feet high--and sailed down toward a steep slant composed of rough chips and fragments which the weather had flaked away from the precipices.
I've got a dog -- and he'll go in the river and bring out chips that you throw in.
Rebecca was capable of certain set tasks, such as keeping the small children from killing themselves and one another, feeding the poultry, picking up chips, hulling strawberries, wiping dishes; but she was thought irresponsible, and Aurelia, needing somebody to lean on (having never enjoyed that luxury with the gifted Lorenzo), leaned on Hannah.
The glamour of inexperience is over your eyes," he answered; "and you see it through a charmed medium: you cannot discern that the gilding is slime and the silk draperies cobwebs; that the marble is sordid slate, and the polished woods mere refuse chips and scaly bark.
Hunger rattled its dry bones among the roasting chestnuts in the turned cylinder; Hunger was shred into atomics in every farthing porringer of husky chips of potato, fried with some reluctant drops of oil.
Ham carrying me on his back and a small box of ours under his arm, and Peggotty carrying another small box of ours, we turned down lanes bestrewn with bits of chips and little hillocks of sand, and went past gas-works, rope-walks, boat-builders' yards, shipwrights' yards, ship-breakers' yards, caulkers' yards, riggers' lofts, smiths' forges, and a great litter of such places, until we came out upon the dull waste I had already seen at a distance; when Ham said,