chivalry


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chiv·al·ry

 (shĭv′əl-rē)
n. pl. chiv·al·ries
1. The medieval system, principles, and customs of knighthood.
2.
a. The qualities idealized by knighthood, such as bravery, courtesy, honor, and gallantry toward women.
b. A manifestation of any of these qualities.
3. A group of knights or gallant gentlemen.

[Middle English chivalrie, from Old French chevalerie, from chevalier, knight; see chevalier.]

chivalry

(ˈʃɪvəlrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Historical Terms) the combination of qualities expected of an ideal knight, esp courage, honour, justice, and a readiness to help the weak
2. courteous behaviour, esp towards women
3. (Historical Terms) the medieval system and principles of knighthood
4. (Historical Terms) knights, noblemen, etc, collectively
[C13: from Old French chevalerie, from chevalier]

chiv•al•ry

(ˈʃɪv əl ri)

n., pl. -ries for 6.
1. the combination of qualities expected of a knight, including courage, generosity, and courtesy.
2. the institution or customs of medieval knighthood.
3. a group of knights or gallant gentlemen.
4. Archaic. a chivalrous act; gallant deed.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French chevalerie <chevalier chevalier]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chivalry - courtesy towards womenchivalry - courtesy towards women    
good manners, courtesy - a courteous manner
2.chivalry - the medieval principles governing knighthood and knightly conduct
principle - a rule or standard especially of good behavior; "a man of principle"; "he will not violate his principles"

chivalry

noun
1. courtesy, politeness, gallantry, courtliness, gentlemanliness He always treated women with old-fashioned chivalry.
2. knight-errantry, knighthood, gallantry, courtliness Our story is set in England, in the age of chivalry.

chivalry

noun
Respectful attention, especially toward women:
Translations
شَهامَه، نَخْوَهنِظامُ الفُروسِيَّه
galantnostrytířskostrytířstvídvornost
ridderlighedridderskab
kurteisiriddaramennska
riterio kodeksasriteriškasriteriškumas
bruņniecībabruņnieciskums
rycerskość
rytierskosť
kibarlıknezaketşövalyelik

chivalry

[ˈʃɪvəlrɪ] N (= courteousness) → caballerosidad f; (in medieval times) → caballería f

chivalry

[ˈʃɪvəlri] n
(in the Middle Ages)chevalerie f
the age of chivalry → l'âge de la chevalerie
(= politeness to women) → galanterie f
(= good behaviour) [soldier] → chevalerie f

chivalry

nRitterlichkeit f; (medieval concept) → Rittertum nt; chivalry is not deades gibt noch Kavaliere

chivalry

[ˈʃɪvlrɪ] ncavalleria

chivalry

(ˈʃivəlri) noun
1. kindness and courteousness especially towards women or the weak.
2. the principles of behaviour of medieval knights.
ˈchivalrous adjective
(negative unchivalrous).
References in classic literature ?
Gentlemen, which means boys, be courteous to the old maids, no matter how poor and plain and prim, for the only chivalry worth having is that which is the readiest to pay deference to the old, protect the feeble, and serve womankind, regardless of rank, age, or color.
You see how it is,' he said to me, `where there is no chivalry, there is no amour-propre.
At instants of momentary wakefulness he mistook a bush for his associate sentinel; his head next sank upon his shoulder, which, in its turn, sought the support of the ground; and, finally, his whole person became relaxed and pliant, and the young man sank into a deep sleep, dreaming that he was a knight of ancient chivalry, holding his midnight vigils before the tent of a recaptured princess, whose favor he did not despair of gaining, by such a proof of devotion and watchfulness.
Brom, who had a degree of rough chivalry in his nature, would fain have carried matters to open warfare and have settled their pretensions to the lady, according to the mode of those most concise and simple reasoners, the knights-errant of yore, -- by single combat; but lchabod was too conscious of the superior might of his adversary to enter the lists against him; he had overheard a boast of Bones, that he would "double the schoolmaster up, and lay him on a shelf of his own schoolhouse;" and he was too wary to give him an opportunity.
I floated along under the spell of enchantment, as if I had been transported to an heroic age, and breathed an atmosphere of chivalry.
Yonder was Arthur, King of Britain; yonder was Guenever; yes, and whole tribes of little provincial kings and kinglets; and in the tented camp yonder, renowned knights from many lands; and likewise the selectest body known to chivalry, the Knights of the Table Round, the most illustrious in Christendom; and biggest fact of all, the very sun of their shining system was yonder couching his lance, the focal point of forty thousand adoring eyes; and all by myself, here was I laying for him.
But mark you one thing: in my fall the world shall see how the chivalry of France meets death.
There is not an excess of delicacy or chivalry in the ordinary country school, and several choice conundrums and bits of verse dealing with the Simpson affair were bandied about among the scholars, uttered always, be it said to their credit, in undertones, and when the Simpson children were not in the group.
I do not think that the best embodiment of chivalry, the realization of the handsomest and most romantic figure ever imagined by painter, could have said this, with a more impressive and affecting dignity than the plain old Doctor did.
The whole of the Danish nobility were in attendance; consisting of a noble boy in the wash-leather boots of a gigantic ancestor, a venerable Peer with a dirty face who seemed to have risen from the people late in life, and the Danish chivalry with a comb in its hair and a pair of white silk legs, and presenting on the whole a feminine appearance.
Mean while the winged Haralds by command Of Sovran power, with awful Ceremony And Trumpets sound throughout the Host proclaim A solemn Councel forthwith to be held At PANDAEMONIUM, the high Capital Of Satan and his Peers: thir summons call'd From every and Band squared Regiment By place or choice the worthiest; they anon With hundreds and with thousands trooping came Attended: all access was throng'd, the Gates And Porches wide, but chief the spacious Hall (Though like a cover'd field, where Champions bold Wont ride in arm'd, and at the Soldans chair Defi'd the best of Panim chivalry To mortal combat or carreer with Lance) Thick swarm'd, both on the ground and in the air, Brusht with the hiss of russling wings.
It seemed to the author, that the existence of the two races in the same country, the vanquished distinguished by their plain, homely, blunt manners, and the free spirit infused by their ancient institutions and laws; the victors, by the high spirit of military fame, personal adventure, and whatever could distinguish them as the Flower of Chivalry, might, intermixed with other characters belonging to the same time and country, interest the reader by the contrast, if the author should not fail on his part.