chlorhexidine


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chlorhexidine

(klɔːˈhɛksɪdiːn)
n
(Pharmacology) an antiseptic compound used in skin cleansers, mouthwashes, etc
[C20: from chlor(o)- + hex(ane) + -i(de) + (am)ine]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chlorhexidine - a long-lasting liquid antiseptic; used by surgeons to wash their hands before performing surgery
antiseptic - a substance that destroys micro-organisms that carry disease without harming body tissues
Translations

chlorhexidine

n clorhexidina
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References in periodicals archive ?
Basic epidemiologic measures, infection control measures, and isolation precautions were instituted, including glove use during personnel-resident contact, hand washing with 4% chlorhexidine after glove removal, reserving personal washcloths and towels for each resident, bathing daily with 4% chlorhexidine-containing soap, and changing towels, clothing, and bed sheets daily.
Is fluoride, chlorhexidine (for plaque removal), or artificial saliva (for individuals taking medications that cause drymouth) necessary?
12 percent chlorhexidine gluconate (Peridex [R] Procter & Gamble) can be successfully applied to the teeth with a sponge swab (Toothette, Halbrand, Inc.
The Chlorhexidine Partners Network (CPN), a new organization composed of leading makers of patient safety technology, is sponsoring a free webinar on the importance of chlorhexidine use to protect patient safety during vascular access.
The veterinary antiseptics market in Asia Pacific, Latin America, and Rest of the World, by product, has been analyzed and estimated for the following products: iodine and iodophors, chlorhexidine, alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, and others (silver compounds and acetic acid).
The use of chlorhexidine wipes during labor does not prevent early-onset neonatal sepsis or vertical transmission of group B streptococcus, according to a randomized, controlled trial conducted in South Africa.
The use of chlorhexidine as a skin preparation solution reduces the incidence of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infections (17,18).
It comes in a convenient 500 mL pump bottle, is compatible with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), and both latex and non-latex gloves.
The trust had appealed an earlier ruling that its lapse led to the anaesthetic being contaminated with chlorhexidine, used to clean patients before surgery.
First sustained release dosage from of chlorhexidine diacetate for topical use was developed by Friedman and Golomb in1982.