chlorpropamide


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chlor·pro·pa·mide

 (klôr-prō′pə-mīd′)
n.
A long-acting sulfonylurea drug, C10H13ClN2O3S, used to treat type 2 diabetes.

chlorpropamide

(klɔːˈprəʊpəˌmaɪd)
n
(Pharmacology) a sulfonylurea drug that reduces blood glucose and is administered orally in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Formula: C10H13ClN2O3S
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References in periodicals archive ?
Six drugs are included in this subclass: chlorpropamide, glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide, tolazamide (Tolinase), and tolbutamide.
Traditional sulfonylureas such as chlorpropamide and glibenclamide, are either obsolete or rarely used now.
chlorpropamide [Diabinese[R]]) should be avoided in Stages III-V renal disease.
Sulfonylureas Chlorpropamide Simulate beta cells to (Diabenase[R]) release more insulin.
Inciting medications are often one of the following: chloramphenicol, ethambutol, isoniazid, digitalis, chloroquine, streptomycin, chlorpropamide, ethchlorvynol, disulfiram, methanol, carbondioxide, amiodaroneandmetals such as lead.
Modifications of antidiabetic drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (adapted from the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI) guidelines) Class Drug Dosing recommendation stages 3 and 4 CKD or kidney transplant First-generation Acetohexamide, Avoid sulfonylureas tolazamide, tolbutamide Chlorpropamide Avoid when GFR < 50 mL/min/ 1.
Phenacetin, paracetamol, metacetamol, oleanolic acid, tolbutamide, chlorpropamide, furafylline, dextromethorphan, 6[beta]-hydroxytestosterone, glucose 6phosphate (G6P), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), [beta]-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP), and tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane hydrochloride (Tris-HCl) were purchased from Sigma Chemical Co.
Pharmaceuticals include a class of oral medications used to stimulate the beta cells to release more insulin, such as sulfonylureas, meglitin ides, and chlorpropamide.
All other contraindications for disulfiram therapy such as (i) subjects receiving or have recently received alcohol, or alcoholcontaining preparations such as cough syrups, elixirs (ii) hypersensitivity to disulfiram or other thiuram derivatives used in the manufacture of items such as pesticides or vulcanized rubber, (iii) concomitant treatment with cefaperazone, chlorpropamide, metronidazole, paraldehyde, nitrofurantoin, griseofulvin, tolbutamide, desipramine, amitriptyline, isoniazid, phenytoin, phenlybutazone, and sulphonylurea class of hypoglycemic agents and (iv) allergy to disulfiram
The administration of the insulin secretagogue drug chlorpropamide in fish leads to the hypoglycaemic effects (Al-Salahy, 2003) and insulin injections into fish also induced hypoglycaemia (Ottolenghi et al.
In contrast, patients receiving chlorpropamide or glibenclamide gained an average of 3 to 4 kg, while insulin treated patients gained approximately 6 kg.