chocker


Also found in: Wikipedia.

chocker

(ˈtʃɒkə)
adj
1. informal full up; packed
2. slang Brit irritated; fed up
[C20: from chock-a-block]
Translations

chocker

[ˈtʃɒkəʳ] ADJ to be chockerestar harto (with de)
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite her incredibly comfy attire, Rita dripped in diamonds for the event - accessorising her loungewear with chandelier earrings and jeweled chocker necklace.
In this look, I choose it to be a scarf chocker as a support accessory to put the look together.
The models wore crowns designed by Bal, and chocker necklaces, earrings by Shri Ram Hari Ram Jewellers.
The tweets, one of which called Rubio a "leightweight chocker," prompted the Florida senator to offer two theories for the spelling errors.
We have to shut the doors and say 'we're full' - the hospital is overcrowded, the doctors surgeries are absolutely chocker and the roads aren't up to it.
The trouble is Alan's diary is chocker block and finding an opportunity was the biggest obstacle.
are "Cardiff's road capacity is not full at all for the majority of the day, but in certain particular times of the day it is fairly chocker.
The ICC's new future tours programme is being worked on and the schedule I've seen is pretty chocker," he said.
Even if you are not haunted by Geoffrey Elton you have probably seen enough of that natty chocker in both its television and Hollywood versions to last a lifetime.
Obviously there will be no racing and it will be far from a normal day's trading but we will be offering special offers only available on Christmas Eve and we hope the shops will be chocker.
uk, a site done on probably 1 per cent of the official site's budget and still chocker with information.
Olsson (1993), "Makroekonomiska chocker och ekonomisk strucktur - En jamforelse mellan Sverige och EG-landerna", Annex 2 to EG-Konsekvensutredningen, Samhallsekonomi.