choir


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choir

 (kwīr)
n.
1. An organized company of singers, especially one performing church music or singing in a church.
2.
a. The part of a church used by such a company of singers.
b. The part of the chancel in a cruciform church that is occupied by this company of singers.
3.
a. A group of instruments of the same kind: a string choir.
b. A division of some pipe organs, containing pipes suitable for accompanying a choir.
4. An organized group: a choir of dancers.
5. One of the orders of angels.
intr.v. choired, choir·ing, choirs
To sing in chorus.

[Middle English quer, quire, from Old French cuer, from Medieval Latin chorus, from Latin, choral dance; see chorus.]

choir

(kwaɪə)
n
1. (Music, other) an organized group of singers, esp for singing in church services
2. (Architecture)
a. the part of a cathedral, abbey, or church in front of the altar, lined on both sides with benches, and used by the choir and clergy. Compare chancel
b. (as modifier): choir stalls.
3. (Instruments) a number of instruments of the same family playing together: a brass choir.
4. (Instruments) Also called: choir organ one of the manuals on an organ controlling a set of soft sweet-toned pipes. Compare great21, swell16
5. (Theology) any of the nine orders of angels in medieval angelology
6. preach to the choir chiefly US to express an opinion to someone who is already in agreement with it
Archaic spelling: quire
[C13 quer, from Old French cuer, from Latin chorus]
ˈchoirˌlike adj

choir

(kwaɪər)

n.
1. a company of singers, esp. an organized group in a church.
2. any group of musicians or musical instruments; a musical company or band, or a division of one: string choir.
3.
a. the part of a church occupied by choir singers.
b. the part of a cruciform church east of the crossing.
4. (medieval) one of the orders of angels.
v.t., v.i.
5. to sing or sound in chorus.
[1250–1300; Middle English quer < Old French cuer < Latin chorus chorus]

Choir

 an organized company of persons or things; a company of singers; a band or company of dancers; an order or division of angels. See also carol, chorus.
Examples: choir of angels, 1667; of cherubim, 1667; of choristers; of cosmical science, 1855; of dancers; of echoes, 1592; of muses, of planets, 1692; of teeth, 1704; of tents, 1382.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.choir - a chorus that sings as part of a religious ceremonychoir - a chorus that sings as part of a religious ceremony
chorus - a group of people assembled to sing together
chorister - a singer in a choir
2.choir - a family of similar musical instrument playing togetherchoir - a family of similar musical instrument playing together
set - a group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used; "a set of books"; "a set of golf clubs"; "a set of teeth"
3.choir - the area occupied by singerschoir - the area occupied by singers; the part of the chancel between sanctuary and nave
area - a part of a structure having some specific characteristic or function; "the spacious cooking area provided plenty of room for servants"
bema, chancel, sanctuary - area around the altar of a church for the clergy and choir; often enclosed by a lattice or railing
Verb1.choir - sing in a choirchoir - sing in a choir      
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
sing - produce tones with the voice; "She was singing while she was cooking"; "My brother sings very well"
Translations
جَوْقَه مُرَتِّلينكُوْرَس
chórpěvecký sborsbor
kor
ĥoro
koor
kuorikuoro
zbor
énekkarkarkórus
kór
聖歌隊
합창단
chorus
choras
koris
chór
zbor
körkor
คณะร้องเพลงประสานเสียง
dàn đồng ca

choir

[ˈkwaɪəʳ]
A. N
1. (Mus) → coro m, coral f
2. (Archit) → coro m
B. CPD choir school N escuela primaria para niños cantores
choir stall Nsilla f de coro
see also practice A4

choir

[ˈkwaɪər] n
[singers] → chœur m, chorale f
I sing in the school choir → Je chante dans la chorale de l'école.
(= part of church) → chœur m

choir

n
Chor m; you are singing to the choir (US: inf) → du rennst offene Türen ein
(Archit) → Chor(raum) m

choir

in cpdsChor-;
choirboy
nChor- or Sängerknabe m
choir loft
nChorempore f
choir master
nChorleiter m
choir practice
nChorprobe f
choir school
nKonvikt ntfür Sängerknaben
choir stall
nChorstuhl m
choir stalls
plChorgestühl nt

choir

[ˈkwaɪəʳ] ncoro

choir

(ˈkwaiə) noun
a group of singers. He used to sing in the church choir.

choir

كُوْرَس sbor kor Chor χορωδία coro kuoro chœur zbor coro 聖歌隊 합창단 koor kor chór coro хор kör คณะร้องเพลงประสานเสียง koro dàn đồng ca 唱诗班
References in classic literature ?
Meg had a voice like a flute, and she and herr mother led the little choir.
Without knowing why, we used to linger on the sidewalk outside the church when the lamps were lighted early for choir practice or prayer-meeting, shivering and talking until our feet were like lumps of ice.
As they turned into the avenue leading to the house, a whole choir of feathered songsters fluted a sudden torrent of melodious greeting from their leafy hiding places.
The day after I helped the choir I made a dash or two with them, but was not lucky.
The congregation being fully assembled, now, the bell rang once more, to warn laggards and stragglers, and then a solemn hush fell upon the church which was only broken by the tittering and whispering of the choir in the gallery.
These meeting-places furnished ample ground for the discussion of current events as viewed by the mas- culine eye, while choir rehearsals, sewing societies, reading circles, church picnics, and the like, gave opportunity for the expression of feminine opinion.
They turned me out o' th' church choir th' only time I ever tried it.
Micawber, 'to have got Wilkins into the Church: or perhaps I shall express my meaning more strictly, if I say the Choir.
Well, then, I wish you'd keep hold o' the tune, when it's set for you; if you're for practising, I wish you'd practise that," said a large jocose-looking man, an excellent wheelwright in his week-day capacity, but on Sundays leader of the choir.
And as in beauty she surpass'd the choir, So nobler than the rest was her attire; A crown of ruddy gold enclosed her brow, Plain without pomp, and rich without a show; A branch of Agnus Castus in her hand, She bore aloft her symbol of command.
There was once, in a little market-town not far from Upsala, a peasant who lived there with his family, digging the earth during the week and singing in the choir on Sundays.
The lion's roar, the fierce wolf's savage howl, The horrid hissing of the scaly snake, The awesome cries of monsters yet unnamed, The crow's ill-boding croak, the hollow moan Of wild winds wrestling with the restless sea, The wrathful bellow of the vanquished bull, The plaintive sobbing of the widowed dove, The envied owl's sad note, the wail of woe That rises from the dreary choir of Hell, Commingled in one sound, confusing sense, Let all these come to aid my soul's complaint, For pain like mine demands new modes of song.