cholent


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cho·lent

 (chō′lənt, chŏl′ənt)
n.
A stew consisting primarily of meat, potatoes, beans, and grains, traditionally prepared before the onset of the Jewish Sabbath, simmered overnight, and eaten as a midday meal.

[Yiddish tsholnt, probably of Romance origin and ultimately from Latin calēns, calent-, present participle of calēre, to be warm; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]

cholent

(ˈtʃolənt)
n
(Judaism) Judaism a meal usually consisting of a stew of meat, potatoes, and pulses prepared before the Sabbath on Friday and left to cook until eaten for Sabbath lunch
References in periodicals archive ?
Both are a sort of Bukharian cholent, left to simmer overnight Friday and, like hakhsh, they're traditionally prepared in a cotton bag submerged in a pot of boiling water, a method likely borrowed from Persian and Iraqi cooking.
6) At home, families would have enjoyed the Yiddish staples of gefilte fish, chicken soup, gribinyes, and cholent with kishke, at weekly Sabbath meals, (7) and rye bread, schmaltz herring, pickles and similar foods more frequently.
More prayer in the synagogue in the morning followed by a kiddush in the synagogue dining hall made up of Jewish delicacies like cholent reserved for Sabbath heartburn, and another festive family lunch at home at noon or a little later if you were a member of a Hasidic sect that dawdled at player in the shul.
From traditional Shabbath Cholent to Garlicky Pot Roast and Sweet Potato Salad with Preserved Lemons, this packs in traditional and modern Jewish kosher fare in an outstanding presentation especially recommended for Jewish kitchens and libraries catering to Jewish cooks.
Dishes contain only small amounts of animal protein and pack in nuts, grains, fruits, herbs and spices and vegetables in dishes such as Orange Beets with Almonds and Vegetarian Cholent.
I warmed up my mother-in-law's wonderful cholent (bean stew) in a Tupperware container in the microwave.
Although Ansky is best known for his play, his profession was as an ethuographer collecting ethnic materials from Jews such as recipes for cholent from Jewish women in Siberia near the time of World War II.
Illustration 9-7: Prairie Farms Lactose Free Almond Milk Illustration 9-8: Snyder's of Hanover Gluten Free Pretzel Sticks Illustration 9-9: Purely American Cholent Chapter 10 Other Food/Ingredient Categories of Note Key Points Some Additional Areas of Food/Ingredient Avoidance Calories Caffeine Fiber Irradiation Illustration 10-1: Radura Symbol Used in U.
Many people today look at animal sacrifice as a moral issue, but many Jews will go to the synagogue and worship, then go home and eat cholent.
Narodetsky to say the blessing over a shot of whiskey, and in between the pickled herring and hot plates of cholent, the rabbi formally introduced the newcomer to the congregation.
It also assumes that most bubbas came from Eastern Europe and that Jewish cooking consists of gefilte fish, chicken soup, challah, cholent, kugel, brisket, and fruit compote.
German poet Heinrich Heine, known for his complicated relationship with Judaism, had cholent, that steaming Sabbath stew that he exalts in an 1851 poem entitled Princess Sabbath.