vibrio

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Related to cholera vibrio: Cholera bacillus

vib·ri·o

 (vĭb′rē-ō′)
n. pl. vib·ri·os
Any of various short, motile, S-shaped or comma-shaped bacteria of the genus Vibrio, especially V. cholerae, which causes cholera.

[New Latin Vibriō, genus name, from Latin vibrāre, to vibrate (from their vibratory motion); see vibrate.]

vib′ri·oid′ (-oid′) adj.

vibrio

(ˈvɪbrɪˌəʊ)
n, pl -os
(Microbiology) any curved or spiral rodlike Gram-negative bacterium of the genus Vibrio, including V. cholerae, which causes cholera: family Spirillaceae
[C19: from New Latin, from Latin vibrāre to vibrate]
ˈvibriˌoid adj

vib•ri•o

(ˈvɪb riˌoʊ)

n., pl. -ri•os.
any of several comma- or S-shaped bacteria of the genus Vibrio, certain species of which are pathogenic.
[< New Latin (1854)]
vib′ri•oid`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vibrio - curved rodlike motile bacteriumvibrio - curved rodlike motile bacterium  
eubacteria, eubacterium, true bacteria - a large group of bacteria having rigid cell walls; motile types have flagella
genus Vibrio - a genus of bacteria
comma bacillus, Vibrio comma - comma-shaped bacteria that cause Asiatic cholera
Vibrio fetus - bacteria that cause abortion in sheep
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for A set of reagents for the preparation of the salt base of the Levenstein-Jensen medium (lot 1), a set of reagents for the preparation of the salt base of the Finn-2 medium (lot 2), the peptone core for the accumulation of cholera vibrio (lot 3), agar-agar microbiological (Lot 4) rea
TUNIS (TAP) - The Public Health Ministry underlined that no case of human disease in relation with the cholera vibrio has been registered contrarily to what has been reported by some social network pages pointing out however that the systematic analyses of the wastewater samples helped to detect in June 2012, the presence of cholera vibrio in one single sample from the Rades MeliE ne-based wastewater treatment station.
John Snow's use of early epidemiologic tools to associate cholera deaths with water from the Broad Street pump, Louis Pasteur's development of vaccines, and Robert Koch's discovery of tubercle bacillus and the cholera vibrio all get their deserved attention; Florence Nightingale's use of numerical data to demonstrate improvements in patient hygiene comes as a pleasant surprise.