choleric


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Related to choleric: melancholic

chol·er·ic

 (kŏl′ə-rĭk, kə-lĕr′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Easily angered; bad-tempered.
b. Archaic Having choler as the dominant humor in terms of medieval physiology.
2. Showing or expressing anger: choleric remarks.

chol′er·i·cal·ly, chol′er·ic·ly adv.

choleric

(ˈkɒlərɪk)
adj
1. bad-tempered
2. (Pathology) bilious or causing biliousness
ˈcholerically, ˈcholericly adv

chol•er•ic

(ˈkɒl ər ɪk, kəˈlɛr ɪk)

adj.
1. extremely irritable or easily angered; irascible: a choleric disposition.
2. Obs.
a. bilious.
b. causing biliousness.
[1300–50; Middle English < Medieval Latin colericus bilious, Latin cholericus < Greek cholerikós. See cholera, -ic]
chol′er•i•cal•ly, chol′er•ic•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.choleric - easily moved to anger; "men of the choleric type take to kicking and smashing"- H.G.Wells
passionate - having or expressing strong emotions
2.choleric - quickly aroused to anger; "a hotheaded commander"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
3.choleric - characterized by anger; "a choleric outburst"; "an irascible response"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"

choleric

adjective bad-tempered, cross, angry, irritable, touchy, petulant, ill-tempered, irascible, tetchy, ratty (Brit. & N.Z. informal), testy, chippy (informal), hot-tempered, quick-tempered He plays a choleric old schoolmaster.

choleric

adjective
2. Feeling or showing anger:
Informal: sore.
Translations

choleric

[ˈkɒlərɪk] ADJcolérico

choleric

[ˈkɒlərɪk] adj (formal) [person, nature] → colérique

choleric

chol·er·ic

a. colérico-a.
References in classic literature ?
The commander of the regiment was an elderly, choleric, stout, and thick-set general with grizzled eyebrows and whiskers, and wider from chest to back than across the shoulders.
If your opponent is of choleric temper, seek to irritate him.
And let a man beware, how he keepeth company with choleric and quarrelsome persons; for they will engage him into their own quarrels.
Black George was, in the main, a peaceable kind of fellow, and nothing choleric nor rash; yet did he bear about him something of what the antients called the irascible, and which his wife, if she had been endowed with much wisdom, would have feared.
A squirrel, from the lofty depths of his domestic tree, chattered either in anger or merriment -- for the squirrel is such a choleric and humorous little personage, that it is hard to distinguish between his moods -- so he chattered at the child, and flung down a nut upon her bead.
Hereupon, a choleric gentleman, who had taken the fourth place on that seat, flew into a most violent passion, and said that it was a breach of contract to mix him up with such villainous company, and that it was poisonous and pernicious and infamous and shameful, and I don't know what else.
He is an elderly man, red-faced, white-haired, and choleric.
Gordon was a man by nature ill-suited to be a schoolmaster: he was impatient and choleric.
It appeared, indeed, from the countenance of this proprietor, that he was of a frank, but hasty and choleric temper.
The choleric M'Dougal took the lead in these railings, being, as has been observed, a little puffed up with the idea of being Mr.
I see his head,' exclaimed the choleric old man; 'damme, I see his head.
As it was clear that he was a choleric fellow in some respects, Mr Swiveller was relieved to find him in such good humour, and, to encourage him in it, smiled himself.