cholesterol


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Related to cholesterol: Triglycerides, Cholesterol Test

cho·les·ter·ol

 (kə-lĕs′tə-rôl′, -rōl′)
n.
A white crystalline substance, C27H45OH, that is found in animal tissues and various foods and is important as a constituent of cell membranes and a precursor to steroid hormones. Cholesterol is normally synthesized by the liver and is transported through the bloodstream by different types of lipoproteins, two of which (HDL and LDL) are routinely measured in blood tests.

[cholester(in), former name for cholesterol (chole- + Greek stereos, solid; see ster- in Indo-European roots + -in) + -ol (so called because it was first found in gallstones).]

cholesterol

(kəˈlɛstəˌrɒl)
n
(Biochemistry) a sterol found in all animal tissues, blood, bile, and animal fats: a precursor of other body steroids. A high level of cholesterol in the blood is implicated in some cases of atherosclerosis, leading to heart disease. Formula: C27H45OH. Former name: cholesterin
[C19: from chole- + Greek stereos hard, solid, so called because first observed in gallstones]

cho•les•ter•ol

(kəˈlɛs təˌroʊl, -ˌrɔl)

n.
a sterol, C27H46O, abundant in animal fats, brain and nerve tissue, meat, and eggs, that functions in the body as a membrane constituent and as a precursor of steroid hormones and bile acids: high blood levels are associated with arteriosclerosis and gallstones.
[1890–95; chole- + Greek ster(eós) solid]

cho·les·ter·ol

(kə-lĕs′tə-rôl′)
A fatty substance found in animals and plants that is a main component of cell membranes and is important in metabolism and hormone production. In vertebrate animals, cholesterol is a major component of the blood. Higher than normal amounts of cholesterol in the blood, which can occur from eating too many fatty foods, may lead to diseases of the arteries such as atherosclerosis.

cholesterol

- Comes from Greek words meaning "bile, gall" and "stiff, solid," plus the ending "-ol."
See also related terms for solid.

cholesterol

A fatty substance produced and used by the body and ingested in food. High levels of certain types of cholesterol can narrow blood vessels, impairing circulation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cholesterol - an animal sterol that is normally synthesized by the liver; the most abundant steroid in animal tissues
steroid alcohol, sterol - any of a group of natural steroid alcohols derived from plants or animals; they are waxy insoluble substances
HDL cholesterol - the cholesterol in high-density lipoproteins; the `good' cholesterol; a high level in the blood is thought to lower the risk of coronary artery disease
LDL cholesterol - the cholesterol in low-density lipoproteins; the `bad' cholesterol; a high level in the blood is thought to be related to various pathogenic conditions
Translations
cholesterol
kolesterol
kolesteroli
kolesterol
コレステロール
콜레스테롤
kolesterol
ไขมันในเส้นเลือด
chất cholestorol

cholesterol

[kəˈlestərɒl] Ncolesterol m

cholesterol

[kəˈlɛstərɒl] ncholestérol m
high cholesterol → excès m de cholestérol

cholesterol

nCholesterin nt

cholesterol

[kəˈlɛstərɒl] ncolesterolo

cholesterol

كوليسترول cholesterol kolesterol Cholesterin χοληστερίνη colesterol kolesteroli cholestérol kolesterol colesterolo コレステロール 콜레스테롤 cholesterol kolesterol cholesterol colesterol холестерин kolesterol ไขมันในเส้นเลือด kolesterol chất cholestorol 胆固醇

cho·les·ter·ol

n. colesterol, lípido precursor de las hormonas sexuales y corticoides adrenales, componente de las grasas y aceites animales, del tejido nervioso y de la sangre;
___ reducerreductor de ___;
high ______ alto.

cholesterol

n colesterol m; LDL (HDL, etc.) — colesterol LDL (HDL, etc.); total — colesterol total
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 99: Latin American Historic Review for Cholesterol
In a 1999 UCLA study that was funded by the company, the Cholestin brand of red yeast rice lowered LDL by an impressive 22 percent in 83 people with high cholesterol levels.
For example, people with coronary disease and those with diabetes are at the highest risk for heart disease, and should be treated most aggressively to reduce their cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
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The truth: Cheerios doesn't lower cholesterol very much.
The trials also showed significant preliminary efficacy results, indicating that CRD5 increased levels of HDL, or good, cholesterol by an average of 18% in the high dose group over the same two-week period.
At the end of the study, the walnut group had significantly lower total cholesterol as well as lower low-density lipoprotein levels (LDL, the bad cholesterol) as compared to the regular Mediterranean diet.
Equally unforeseen, say investigators, is their finding that non-nerve cells called glia seem to provide the cholesterol that controls synapse building.
The softer products were found to be healthier because the harder ones have more of what are called trans-fatty acids, which raise cholesterol and the risk of heart disease.
First, it adds to your own cholesterol, raising the level of cholesterol in the blood.
Notably, HMG-CoA reductase is the enzyme necessary for the liver to produce endogenous cholesterol (the kind naturally made by the body as opposed to cholesterol related to diet).