choose

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choose

 (cho͞oz)
v. chose (chōz), cho·sen (chō′zən), choos·ing, choos·es
v.tr.
1. To select from a number of possible alternatives; decide on and pick out: Which book did you choose at the library?
2.
a. To prefer above others: chooses the supermarket over the neighborhood grocery store.
b. To determine or decide: chose to fly rather than drive.
v.intr.
To make a choice; make a selection: was used to doing as she chose.
Phrasal Verb:
choose up
To choose players and form sides or teams for a game, such as baseball or softball.
Idiom:
cannot choose but
Can only do; cannot do otherwise: We cannot choose but to observe the rules.

[Middle English chesen, from Old English cēosan; see geus- in Indo-European roots.]

choos′er n.

choose

(tʃuːz)
vb, chooses, choosing, chose or chosen
1. to select (a person, thing, course of action, etc) from a number of alternatives
2. (tr; takes a clause as object or an infinitive) to consider it desirable or proper: I don't choose to read that book.
3. (intr) to like; please: you may stand if you choose.
4. cannot choose but to be obliged to: we cannot choose but vote for him.
5. nothing to choose between little to choose between (of two people or objects) almost equal
[Old English ceosan; related to Old Norse kjōsa, Old High German kiosan]
ˈchooser n

choose

(tʃuz)

v. chose, cho•sen, choos•ing. v.t.
1. to select from a number of possibilities: She chose July for her wedding.
2. to prefer or decide (to do something): to choose to speak.
3. to want or desire, as one thing over another.
v.i.
4. to make a choice: to choose carefully.
5. to be inclined: Stay or go, as you choose.
6. choose up,
a. to select the team members of.
b. to pick players for opposing teams.
Idioms:
cannot choose but, cannot do otherwise than: We cannot choose but obey.
[before 1000; Middle English chosen,chesen, Old English cēosan, c. Old High German kiosan, Gothic kiusan; akin to Greek geúesthai to enjoy, Latin gustāre to taste]
choos′er, n.

choose

When you choose someone or something from a group of people or things, you decide which one you want.

Why did he choose these particular places?

The past tense of choose is chose, not 'choosed'. The past participle is chosen.

I chose a yellow dress.
Miles Davis was chosen as the principal soloist on both works.
1. 'pick' and 'select'

Pick and select have very similar meanings to choose. Select is more formal than choose or pick, and is not usually used in conversation.

Next time let's pick somebody who can fight.
They select books that seem to them important.
2. 'appoint'

If you appoint someone to a job or official position, you formally choose them for it.

It made sense to appoint a banker to this job.
The Prime Minister has appointed a civilian as defence minister.
3. 'choose to'

If someone chooses to do something, they do it because they want to or because they feel it is right.

Some women choose to manage on their own.
The majority of people do not choose to be a single parent.
The way we choose to bring up children is vitally important.

You do not say that someone 'picks to do' something or 'selects to do' something.

choose


Past participle: chosen
Gerund: choosing

Imperative
choose
choose
Present
I choose
you choose
he/she/it chooses
we choose
you choose
they choose
Preterite
I chose
you chose
he/she/it chose
we chose
you chose
they chose
Present Continuous
I am choosing
you are choosing
he/she/it is choosing
we are choosing
you are choosing
they are choosing
Present Perfect
I have chosen
you have chosen
he/she/it has chosen
we have chosen
you have chosen
they have chosen
Past Continuous
I was choosing
you were choosing
he/she/it was choosing
we were choosing
you were choosing
they were choosing
Past Perfect
I had chosen
you had chosen
he/she/it had chosen
we had chosen
you had chosen
they had chosen
Future
I will choose
you will choose
he/she/it will choose
we will choose
you will choose
they will choose
Future Perfect
I will have chosen
you will have chosen
he/she/it will have chosen
we will have chosen
you will have chosen
they will have chosen
Future Continuous
I will be choosing
you will be choosing
he/she/it will be choosing
we will be choosing
you will be choosing
they will be choosing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been choosing
you have been choosing
he/she/it has been choosing
we have been choosing
you have been choosing
they have been choosing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been choosing
you will have been choosing
he/she/it will have been choosing
we will have been choosing
you will have been choosing
they will have been choosing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been choosing
you had been choosing
he/she/it had been choosing
we had been choosing
you had been choosing
they had been choosing
Conditional
I would choose
you would choose
he/she/it would choose
we would choose
you would choose
they would choose
Past Conditional
I would have chosen
you would have chosen
he/she/it would have chosen
we would have chosen
you would have chosen
they would have chosen
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.choose - pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives; "Take any one of these cards"; "Choose a good husband for your daughter"; "She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her"
empanel, impanel, panel - select from a list; "empanel prospective jurors"
anoint - choose by or as if by divine intervention; "She was anointed the head of the Christian fundamentalist group"
field - select (a team or individual player) for a game; "The Buckeyes fielded a young new quarterback for the Rose Bowl"
sieve, sift - distinguish and separate out; "sift through the job candidates"
draw - select or take in from a given group or region; "The participants in the experiment were drawn from a representative population"
dial - choose by means of a dial; "dial a telephone number"
plump, go - give support (to) or make a choice (of) one out of a group or number; "I plumped for the losing candidates"
pick - select carefully from a group; "She finally picked her successor"; "He picked his way carefully"
elect - choose; "I elected to have my funds deposited automatically"
excerpt, extract, take out - take out of a literary work in order to cite or copy
cull out, winnow - select desirable parts from a group or list; "cull out the interesting letters from the poet's correspondence"; "winnow the finalists from the long list of applicants"
cream off, skim off - pick the best
pick over, sieve out - separate or remove; "The customer picked over the selection"
set apart, assign, specify - select something or someone for a specific purpose; "The teacher assigned him to lead his classmates in the exercise"
single out - select from a group; "She was singled out for her outstanding performance"
decide, make up one's mind, determine - reach, make, or come to a decision about something; "We finally decided after lengthy deliberations"
think of - choose in one's mind; "Think of any integer between 1 and 25"
specify, fix, limit, set, determine, define - decide upon or fix definitely; "fix the variables"; "specify the parameters"
adopt, espouse, follow - choose and follow; as of theories, ideas, policies, strategies or plans; "She followed the feminist movement"; "The candidate espouses Republican ideals"
screen out, sieve, sort, screen - examine in order to test suitability; "screen these samples"; "screen the job applicants"
vote in - elect in a voting process; "They voted in Clinton"
elect - select by a vote for an office or membership; "We elected him chairman of the board"
nominate, propose - put forward; nominate for appointment to an office or for an honor or position; "The President nominated her as head of the Civil Rights Commission"
vote - express one's preference for a candidate or for a measure or resolution; cast a vote; "He voted for the motion"; "None of the Democrats voted last night"
2.choose - select as an alternative over another; "I always choose the fish over the meat courses in this restaurant"; "She opted for the job on the East coast"
cop out, opt out - choose not to do something, as out of fear of failing; "She copped out when she was supposed to get into the hang glider"
3.choose - see fit or proper to act in a certain way; decide to act in a certain way; "She chose not to attend classes and now she failed the exam"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"

choose

verb
2. wish, want, desire, see fit You can just take out the interest every year, if you choose.
Proverbs
"If you run after two hares you will catch neither"

choose

verb
1. To make a choice from a number of alternatives:
cull, elect, opt (for), pick (out), select, single (out).
2. To have the desire or inclination to:
Idioms: have a mind, see fit.
Translations
يَخْتاريَخْتارُيُقَرِّر
vybratzvolitrozhodnout sevolitvybírat si
vælgeudvælge
elekti
valima
برگزیدن
valita
לבחור
biratiizabratiodabratiodlučiti
kiválasztmegválaszt
memilihpilih
veljavelja, ákveîa
選ぶえらぶ
선택하다
jokio skirtumonuspręstipasirinkti
gribētizmeklētizvēlētiesvēlēties
alegepreferavrea
izbrati
izabratiodabratiodlučiti
välja
เลือก
lựa chọn

choose

[tʃuːz] (chose (pt) (chosen (pp)))
A. VT
1. (gen) → elegir, escoger; (= select) [+ team] → seleccionar; [+ candidate] → elegir
he was chosen (as) leaderfue elegido líder
there is nothing to choose between themvale tanto el uno como el otro, no veo la diferencia entre ellos
2. (= opt) to choose to do sthoptar por hacer algo
if I don't choose tosi no quiero
B. VIelegir, escoger
to choose betweenelegir entre
there are several to choose fromhay varios entre los que elegir
as/when I choosecomo/cuando me parezca, como/cuando me dé la gana (Sp)

choose

[ˈtʃuːz] [chose] [ˈtʃəʊz] (pt) [chosen] [ˈtʃəʊzən] (pp)
vt [+ thing, person] → choisir
to choose to do sth → décider de faire qch
there's little to choose between them, there's nothing to choose between them (mainly British)il y a peu de différence entre eux chosen few
vi (= make a choice) → choisir
It's difficult to choose → C'est difficile de choisir.
to choose between → choisir entre
to choose from → choisir parmi

choose

pret <chose>, ptp <chosen>
vt
(= select)(aus)wählen, sich (dat)aussuchen; to choose a teameine Mannschaft auswählen or zusammenstellen; they chose him as their leader or to be their leadersie wählten ihn zu ihrem Anführer; in a few well-chosen wordsin wenigen wohlgesetzten Worten
(= decide, elect) to choose to do somethinges vorziehen, etw zu tun; may I come earlier? — if you choose todarf ich früher kommen? — wenn Sie wollen
vi
to choose (between or among/from)wählen or eine Wahl treffen (→ zwischen +dat/aus or unter +dat); there is nothing or little to choose between themsie sind gleich gut; there aren’t many to choose fromdie Auswahl ist nicht sehr groß
(= decide, elect) as/if you choosewie/wenn Sie wollen

choose

[tʃuːz] (chose (vb: pt) (chosen (pp)))
1. vtscegliere
to choose to do sth → scegliere or decidere di fare qc
2. viscegliere
to choose between → scegliere tra
there is nothing to choose between them → uno vale l'altro
to choose from → scegliere da or tra
there were several to choose from → vi era parecchia scelta
as/when I choose → come/quando voglio or decido io

choose

(tʃuːz) past tense chose (tʃouz) : past participle chosen (ˈtʃouzn) verb
1. to take (one thing rather than another from a number of things) according to what one wants. Always choose (a book) carefully.
2. to decide (on one course of action rather than another). If he chooses to resign, let him do so.
nothing / not much to choose between
hardly any difference between. There's not much to choose between the two methods.

choose

يَخْتارُ vybrat vælge auswählen επιλέγω elegir valita choisir birati scegliere 選ぶ 선택하다 kiezen velge wybrać escolher выбирать välja เลือก seçmek lựa chọn 选择

choose

vt. escoger, elegir.
References in classic literature ?
Hepzibah had no natural turn for cookery, and, to say the truth, had fairly incurred her present meagreness by often choosing to go without her dinner rather than be attendant on the rotation of the spit, or ebullition of the pot.
There were empty rooms at Bly, and it was only a question of choosing the right one.
It seems almost certain that we have been choosing the wrong time for studying the oyster.
Whether it were a question of fact, of spelling, or of date, of going swimming or fishing, of choosing a book in the Sunday-school library or a stick of candy at the village store, he had no sooner determined on one plan of action than his wish fondly reverted to the opposite one.
Johnson the privilege of choosing me a name, but told him he must not take from me the name of "Frederick.
I could not unlove him, because I felt sure he would soon marry this very lady--because I read daily in her a proud security in his intentions respecting her--because I witnessed hourly in him a style of courtship which, if careless and choosing rather to be sought than to seek, was yet, in its very carelessness, captivating, and in its very pride, irresistible.
He had an aversion to yielding so completely to his feelings, choosing rather to absent himself; and eating once in twenty-four hours seemed sufficient sustenance for him.
It is something more than the mere fact of her choosing to disguise herself to forward her own private ends that causes my present perplexity.
But if you were free to-day, to-morrow, yesterday, can even I believe that you would choose a dowerless girl -- you who, in your very confidence with her, weigh everything by Gain: or, choosing her, if for a moment you were false enough to your one guiding principle to do so, do I not know that your repentance and regret would surely follow.
My heart failed me when I saw him squaring at me with every demonstration of mechanical nicety, and eyeing my anatomy as if he were minutely choosing his bone.
The silver bore no large proportion in amount to the gold, because the long pieces of linen which formed his chief work were always partly paid for in gold, and out of the silver he supplied his own bodily wants, choosing always the shillings and sixpences to spend in this way.
Had I any ideal by which to test and measure the damsels of the world who were to pass before my critical choosing eye?