choreography

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Related to choreographies: choreographic, Dance director

cho·re·og·ra·phy

 (kôr′ē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cho·re·og·ra·phies
1.
a. The art of creating and arranging dances or ballets.
b. A work created by this art.
2. Something, such as a series of planned situations, likened to dance arrangements.

[French chorégraphie : Greek khoreia, choral dance; see chorea + -graphie, writing (from Latin -graphia, -graphy).]

cho′re·o·graph′ic (-ə-grăf′ĭk) adj.
cho′re·o·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

choreography

(ˌkɒrɪˈɒɡrəfɪ) or

choregraphy

n
1. (Dancing) the composition of dance steps and sequences for ballet and stage dancing
2. (Dancing) the steps and sequences of a ballet or dance
3. (Dancing) the notation representing such steps
4. (Dancing) the art of dancing
[C18: from Greek khoreia dance + -graphy]
ˌchoreˈographer, choˈregrapher n
choreographic, choregraphic adj
ˌchoreoˈgraphically, ˌchoreˈgraphically adv

cho•re•og•ra•phy

(ˌkɔr iˈɒg rə fi, ˌkoʊr-)

n.
1. the art of composing ballets and other dances and planning and arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers.
2. the movements, steps, and patterns composed for a dance, piece of music, show, etc.
3. the technique of representing the various movements in dancing by a system of notation.
4. the arrangement or manipulation of actions leading up to an event.
[1780–90; < Latin chorē(a) (see chorea) + -o- + -graphy]
cho`re•og′ra•pher, n.
cho•re•o•graph•ic (ˌkɔr i əˈgræf ɪk, ˌkoʊr-) adj.
cho`re•o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

choreography

1. the art of composing dances for the stage, especially in conceiving and realizing the movements of the dancers.
2. the technique of representing dance movements through a notational scheme.
3. the art of dancing. Also called choregraphy, orchesography. — choreographer, n. — choreographic, adj.
See also: Dancing

choreography

1. The art or practice of composing dance steps.
2. The art of composing dance, or the steps composed.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.choreography - a show involving artistic dancingchoreography - a show involving artistic dancing  
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
ballet, concert dance - a theatrical representation of a story that is performed to music by trained dancers
modern dance - a style of theatrical dancing that is not as restricted as classical ballet; movements are expressive of feelings
apache dance - a violent fast dance in French vaudeville (an apache is a member of the French underworld)
belly dance, belly dancing, danse du ventre - a Middle Eastern dance in which the dancer makes sensuous movements of the hips and abdomen
bolero - a Spanish dance in triple time accompanied by guitar and castanets
cakewalk - a strutting dance based on a march; was performed in minstrel shows; originated as a competition among Black dancers to win a cake
cancan - a high-kicking dance of French origin performed by a female chorus line
nude dancing - erotic dancing with little or no clothing
show - a social event involving a public performance or entertainment; "they wanted to see some of the shows on Broadway"
2.choreography - the representation of dancing by symbols as music is represented by notes
dance - an artistic form of nonverbal communication
3.choreography - a notation used by choreographers
notation, notational system - a technical system of symbols used to represent special things
Labanotation - a system of notation for dance movements that uses symbols to represent points on a dancer's body and the direction of the dancer's movement and the tempo and the dynamics
Translations
choreografie
koreografia
koreográfia

choreography

[ˌkɒrɪˈɒgrəfɪ] Ncoreografía f

choreography

[ˌkɒriˈɒgrəfi] nchorégraphie f

choreography

nChoreografie f

choreography

[ˌkɒrɪˈɒgrəfɪ] ncoreografia
References in periodicals archive ?
Emotional tributes ruled: Alan Johnson received fire Career Achievement Award (among his many choreographies is Springtime for Hitler from Mel Brooks's film The Producers); Sallie Whalen was given the Educator Award; and producer Don Mischer received the Governors Award.
Using the Royal Academy of Dance syllabus as a model and pooling the best of what they had learned in Spain--from such icons as Mercedes and Albano, Juanjo Linares, Pedro Azorin, Enrique el Cojo, and Juan Urbeltz--they compiled six junior, three senior, and three teacher's levels of graduated technique and choreographies covering flamenco, regional dances, and the escuela bolera, Spain's version of classical ballet.
With delight and great musical feeling, the company performed three choreographies of George Balanchine--Apollon-Musagete, Stravinsky Violin Concerto and Symphony in Three Movements --Bronislava Nijinska's Les Noces and two premieres.