choreologist


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choreologist

(ˌkɒriːˈɒlədʒɪst)
n
(Dancing) a person who is expert in choreology
References in periodicals archive ?
Her main area of research has been musical theatre in Spain during the second half of the eighteenth century in such genres as the tonadilla and dance music--this latter field together with the choreologist Maria Jose Ruiz Mayordomo.
A choreologist is now a permanent employee of the Royal, where newly acquired ballets are notated as created and older ones are preserved in the archives for study and potential revivals.
But the daily class involves a rigorous two hours of ballet exercises where the whole team are put through their paces by ballet mistress and choreologist Pat Durham.
Benesh choreologist Jane Bourne, featured scenery and costumes by Susan
His second work for Ballet Hispanico is Tears for Violeta, which was created in September of 1995 while I was rehearsal director and choreologist with the company.
All ten of the Balanchine pieces in Diablo's repertory have been set by choreologist Marina Eglevsky.
For its season opener Diablo performed George Balanchine's 1928 Apollo as reconstructed by choreologist Marina Eglevsky for the first time, thanks to a grant from the Rudolf Nureyev Dance Foundation.
With his untimely death in 1973, his ballets became set, and the current stagings by scrupulous choreologist Georgette Tsinguirides are whistleclean in detail.
My friend and colleague Kristin once met someone who knew what a choreologist was.
This paradigm of classical ballet was staged by Monica Parker, the British Benesh choreologist, for more than one hundred people wearing more than two hundred and seventy costumes.
A choreologist sets it from the Benesh notation (besides Walker, there is Monica Parker at the Royal Ballet, who often works with other companies).
Interviewed recently in London where she came to learn the ballet for ABT with Monica Parker, MacMillan's choreologist, she exclaims over the experience of working with her: "She's amazing