chorister


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Related to chorister: declivities

cho·ris·ter

 (kôr′ĭ-stər, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A singer in a choir, especially a choirboy or choirgirl.
2. A leader of a choir.

[Middle English queristre, from Anglo-Norman *cueristre, from Medieval Latin chorista, from chorus, chorus, from Latin, choral dance; see chorus.]

chorister

(ˈkɒrɪstə)
n
(Music, other) a singer in a choir, esp a choirboy
[C14: from Medieval Latin chorista]

chor•is•ter

(ˈkɔr ə stər, ˈkɒr-)

n.
1. a singer in a choir.
[1325–75; Middle English queristre < Anglo-French quer choir]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chorister - a singer in a choir
choir - a chorus that sings as part of a religious ceremony
choirboy - a boy who sings in a choir
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
Translations
مُنشد، مُرتل في جَوْقَه
chórista
kirkesangerkordreng
karénekes
choristas
korists
chórista
koro şarkıcısı

chorister

[ˈkɒrɪstəʳ] Ncorista mf (US) → director(a) m/f de un coro

chorister

[ˈkɒrɪstər] nchoriste mf

chorister

n(Kirchen)chormitglied nt; (= boy)Chorknabe m

chorister

[ˈkɒrɪstəʳ] n (Rel) → corista m/f

chorister

(ˈkoristə) noun
a member of a (church) choir, especially a boy.
References in classic literature ?
He perceived in the tavern a pert boy between twelve and fifteen years of age whom he fancied he had seen not twenty minutes before under the guise of a chorister.
He only feels confident that you will do it," said Dorothea, in a voice as clear and unhesitating as that of a young chorister chanting a credo, "because you mean to enter Parliament as a member who cares for the improvement of the people, and one of the first things to be made better is the state of the land and the laborers.
You know now, don't you, that even a poor monotonous chorister and grinder of music--in his niche--may be troubled with some stray sort of ambition, aspiration, restlessness, dissatisfaction, what shall we call it?
In old Colonel Pyncheon's funeral discourse the clergyman absolutely canonized his deceased parishioner, and opening, as it were, a vista through the roof of the church, and thence through the firmament above, showed him seated, harp in hand, among the crowned choristers of the spiritual world.
While this dirge was sang, in a low and melancholy tone, by the female choristers, the others were divided into two bands, of which one was engaged in bedecking, with such embroidery as their skill and taste could compass, a large silken pall, destined to cover the bier of Athelstane, while the others busied themselves in selecting, from baskets of flowers placed before them, garlands, which they intended for the same mournful purpose.
Artists, scene-shifters, dancers, supers, choristers, subscribers were all asking questions, shouting and hustling one another.
There was no theatrical procession of demure little choristers, trying their best not to simper under the admiring gaze of the congregation: the people's share in the service was taken by the people themselves, unaided, except that a few good voices, judiciously posted here and there among them, kept the singing from going too far astray.
Skimpole, "to this effect: 'Harold Skimpole loves to see the sun shine, loves to hear the wind blow, loves to watch the changing lights and shadows, loves to hear the birds, those choristers in Nature's great cathedral.
and you the feathered choristers of nature, whose sweetest notes not even Handel can excell, tune your melodious throats to celebrate her appearance.
In the choir the bored choristers could be heard trying their voices and blowing their noses.
To this inquiry the invisible chorus replied, in a strain that sounded like the voices of many choristers singing to the mighty swell of the old church organ--a strain that seemed borne to the sexton's ears upon a wild wind, and to die away as it passed onward; but the burden of the reply was still the same, "Gabriel Grub
James Randle, director of music at the Chorister School, leads the outreach programme which began in 2003, initially as a project working solely with Sunderland primary schools.