chorography

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Related to chorographic: Chorology

cho·rog·ra·phy

 (kə-rŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. The technique of mapping a region or district.
2. A description or map of a region.

[Latin chōrographia, from Greek khōrographiā : khōros, place; see ghē- in Indo-European roots + -graphiā, -graphy.]

cho·rog′ra·pher n.
cho′ro·graph′ic (kôr′ə-grăf′ĭk), cho′ro·graph′i·cal adj.
cho′ro·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

chorography

(kɒˈrɒɡrəfɪ)
npl -phies
1. (Physical Geography) the technique of mapping regions
2. (Physical Geography) a description or map of a region, as opposed to a small area
[C16: via Latin from Greek khōrographia, from khōros place, country + -graphy]
choˈrographer n
chorographic, ˌchoroˈgraphical adj
ˌchoroˈgraphically adv

cho•rog•ra•phy

(kəˈrɒg rə fi, kɔ-, koʊ-)

n., pl. -phies.
a systematic description of regional geography, or the methods used to arrive at this.
[1550–60; < Latin chōrographia < Greek chōrographía=chōro-, comb. form of chṓra region + -graphia -graphy]

chorography

1. a description, map, or chart of a particular region or area.
2. the art of preparing such descriptions or maps. — chorographer, n. — chorographic, adj.
See also: Maps

chorography

The art or practice of drawing maps.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Within the chorographic section that gives accounts of Holinshed as archipelagic history, Wales in particular is restored to visibility.
Nowell's lengthy speeches on the correct behavior for Gresham and his companions give his audience a chorographic description of London and some of its inhabitants while also relating the potential good works of Gresham and his contemporaries to childrearing.
If you are looking for a sentimental yet practical item for your husband or grown son that will stand the test of time, consider a Sport Chorographic watch from Guess.
Indeed, the structural significance of the specifically Italian cartographic dimension of Dante's Inferno has been generally overlooked by Dante studies since the systematic nature of the poet's deployment of chorographic similes and descriptions of Italy has not been recognized.
While Taylor frequently reminds readers that he is not following in the footsteps of "learned Camden, or laborious Speede" and that readers seeking descriptions of the country as a whole must turn to these and other chorographic writers and mapmakers, the domestic travel narratives nevertheless provide a distinct chorographic function that invigorates Taylor's celebration of nation.
Klutz, "The Archer and the Cross: Chorographic Astrology and Literary Design in the Testament of Solomon.
Yet Martins completely transformed its function, on describing with chorographic precision the Portuguese territory which was to be the setting for his historical drama.
The realm of the chorographic microcosm is often enriched by details of imaginary scenes, sea monsters, and wild beasts to emphasize the dangers of a voyage or even to hide the cartographers' ignorance, as Jonathan Swift mockingly wrote.
These serve as the basis for a restatement of some of the principal themes of the book, particularly the difference between the communicentric approach and the chorographic approach, which sought to provide an accurate picture of the city.
The Venetian Fra Mauro used other resources of nautical charts to craft a map of startling accuracy about 1450, critiquing the utility of Ptolemy's prescriptions and placing a chorographic map of Paradise outside the inhabited world.
This is evident not only in the falling statistics of rural/urban personal relationships, occupational exchange, and book owning, but also in the relationship between print culture and community: in which the assumption that books, libraries, and reading clubs homogenized oral tradition, while it may hold at the gentry level as part of the provincial town's pervasive renaissance role as leisure-theatre, needs to be offset by the ways in which print reinforced separate awareness through the impetus which it gave to chorographic localism.
27) Astrological almanacs were arguably even more instrumental in forging an awareness of regional and local uniqueness, in part because they were far cheaper and more plentiful than such cartographic and chorographic texts and in part because astrology laid such remarkable stress on the importance of place per se.