chorus


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Related to chorus: Greek chorus, Chorus effect

cho·rus

 (kôr′əs)
n. pl. cho·rus·es
1.
a. A group of singers who perform together, usually singing multi-part compositions with more than one singer for each part.
b. A group of vocalists and dancers who support the soloists and leading performers in operas, musical comedies, and revues.
2.
a. A musical composition usually in four or more parts written for a large number of singers.
b. A refrain in a song, especially one in which the soloist is joined by other performers or audience members.
c. A solo section based on the main melody of a popular song and played by a member of the group.
3.
a. A group of persons who speak or sing in unison a given part or composition in drama or poetry recitation.
b. An actor in Elizabethan drama who recites the prologue and epilogue to a play and sometimes comments on the action.
4.
a. A group in a classical Greek drama whose songs and dances present an exposition of or, in later tradition, a disengaged commentary on the action.
b. The portion of a classical Greek drama consisting of choric dance and song.
5.
a. A speech, song, or other utterance made in concert by many people.
b. A simultaneous utterance by a number of people: a chorus of jeers from the bystanders.
c. A simultaneous production of sound by numerous animals: the midday chorus of cicadas.
d. A simultaneous production of sound by numerous inanimate objects: a chorus of lawnmowers from the neighborhood's backyards.
tr. & intr.v. cho·rused, cho·rus·ing, cho·rus·es or cho·russed or cho·rus·sing or cho·rus·ses
To sing or utter in chorus.
Idiom:
in chorus
All together; in unison.

[Latin, choral dance, from Greek khoros; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]

chorus

(ˈkɔːrəs)
n, pl -ruses
1. (Music, other) a large choir of singers or a piece of music composed for such a choir
2. (Music, other) a body of singers or dancers who perform together, in contrast to principals or soloists
3. (Music, other) a section of a song in which a soloist is joined by a group of singers, esp in a recurring refrain
4. (Pop Music) an intermediate section of a pop song, blues, etc, as distinct from the verse
5. (Jazz) jazz any of a series of variations on a theme
6. (Poetry) (in ancient Greece)
a. a lyric poem sung by a group of dancers, originally as a religious rite
b. an ode or series of odes sung by a group of actors
7. (Theatre)
a. (in classical Greek drama) the actors who sang the chorus and commented on the action of the play
b. actors playing a similar role in any drama
8. (Theatre) (esp in Elizabethan drama)
a. the actor who spoke the prologue, etc
b. the part of the play spoken by this actor
9. a group of people or animals producing words or sounds simultaneously
10. any speech, song, or other utterance produced by a group of people or animals simultaneously: a chorus of sighs; the dawn chorus.
11. in chorus in unison
vb
to speak, sing, or utter (words, etc) in unison
[C16: from Latin, from Greek khoros]

cho•rus

(ˈkɔr əs, ˈkoʊr-)

n., pl. -rus•es, n.
1.
a. a group of persons singing in unison.
b. (in an opera, oratorio, etc.) such a group singing choral parts in connection with soloists or individual singers.
c. a piece of music for singing in unison.
d. a part of a song that recurs at intervals, usu. following each verse; refrain.
2. simultaneous utterance in singing, speaking, shouting, etc.
3. the sounds so uttered: a chorus of jeers.
4. (in a musical show) those performers in the company who sing or dance as a group and usu. do not play separate roles.
5. (in ancient Greece)
a. an ode or series of odes sung by a group of actors in a drama.
b. the group itself.
6.
a. an actor or group of actors functioning like the ancient Greek chorus, as in Elizabethan drama.
b. the role performed by this chorus.
v.t., v.i.
7. to sing or speak simultaneously.
Idioms:
in chorus, with everyone speaking or singing simultaneously; in unison.
[1555–65; < Latin < Greek chorós a dance, band of dancers and singers]
burden, refrain, chorus - The burden is the main theme or gist of a speech, book, or argument—or the refrain or chorus of a song.
See also related terms for refrain.

Chorus

 a company of singers; a simultaneous outburst of speech. See also carol, choir.
Examples: chorus of bad language; of complaints; of conversation, 1845; of Greek actors; of laughter; of planets, 1660; of porpoises, 1698; of singers, 1656.

chorus


Past participle: chorused
Gerund: chorusing

Imperative
chorus
chorus
Present
I chorus
you chorus
he/she/it choruses
we chorus
you chorus
they chorus
Preterite
I chorused
you chorused
he/she/it chorused
we chorused
you chorused
they chorused
Present Continuous
I am chorusing
you are chorusing
he/she/it is chorusing
we are chorusing
you are chorusing
they are chorusing
Present Perfect
I have chorused
you have chorused
he/she/it has chorused
we have chorused
you have chorused
they have chorused
Past Continuous
I was chorusing
you were chorusing
he/she/it was chorusing
we were chorusing
you were chorusing
they were chorusing
Past Perfect
I had chorused
you had chorused
he/she/it had chorused
we had chorused
you had chorused
they had chorused
Future
I will chorus
you will chorus
he/she/it will chorus
we will chorus
you will chorus
they will chorus
Future Perfect
I will have chorused
you will have chorused
he/she/it will have chorused
we will have chorused
you will have chorused
they will have chorused
Future Continuous
I will be chorusing
you will be chorusing
he/she/it will be chorusing
we will be chorusing
you will be chorusing
they will be chorusing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been chorusing
you have been chorusing
he/she/it has been chorusing
we have been chorusing
you have been chorusing
they have been chorusing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been chorusing
you will have been chorusing
he/she/it will have been chorusing
we will have been chorusing
you will have been chorusing
they will have been chorusing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been chorusing
you had been chorusing
he/she/it had been chorusing
we had been chorusing
you had been chorusing
they had been chorusing
Conditional
I would chorus
you would chorus
he/she/it would chorus
we would chorus
you would chorus
they would chorus
Past Conditional
I would have chorused
you would have chorused
he/she/it would have chorused
we would have chorused
you would have chorused
they would have chorused
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chorus - any utterance produced simultaneously by a groupchorus - any utterance produced simultaneously by a group; "a chorus of boos"
sound - the sudden occurrence of an audible event; "the sound awakened them"
2.chorus - a group of people assembled to sing together
choir - a chorus that sings as part of a religious ceremony
musical group, musical organisation, musical organization - an organization of musicians who perform together
3.chorus - the part of a song where a soloist is joined by a group of singers
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
tra-la, tra-la-la - a set of nonsensical syllables used while humming a refrain
4.chorus - a body of dancers or singers who perform togetherchorus - a body of dancers or singers who perform together
corps de ballet, ensemble - the chorus of a ballet company
line - a formation of people or things one beside another; "the line of soldiers advanced with their bayonets fixed"; "they were arrayed in line of battle"; "the cast stood in line for the curtain call"
chorine, chorus girl, showgirl - a woman who dances in a chorus line
5.chorus - a company of actors who comment (by speaking or singing in unison) on the action in a classical Greek playchorus - a company of actors who comment (by speaking or singing in unison) on the action in a classical Greek play
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
troupe, company - organization of performers and associated personnel (especially theatrical); "the traveling company all stayed at the same hotel"
Verb1.chorus - utter in unison; "`yes,' the children chorused"
let loose, let out, utter, emit - express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words); "She let out a big heavy sigh"; "He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand"
2.chorus - sing in a choirchorus - sing in a choir      
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
sing - produce tones with the voice; "She was singing while she was cooking"; "My brother sings very well"

chorus

noun
1. refrain, response, strain, burden Everyone joined in the chorus.
2. choir, singers, ensemble, vocalists, choristers The chorus was singing 'The Ode to Joy'.
in chorus in unison, as one, all together, in concert, in harmony, in accord, with one voice `Let us in,' they all wailed in chorus.
Translations
بِصَوْتٍ واحِدفِرْقَةُ مُغَنّينلازِمَه أو غنائيهيُغَنّون، يَتَكَلَّمون بِصَوْتٍ واحِد
pěvecký sborrefrénrevuální sborřícisborové volání
koromkvædrefræn
kertosäekuoro
énekkarkóruskórusban mondkórusmû
kór, söngflokkurláta til sín heyra í einum kórsamtaka hrópsöngflokkurviîlag
pasakytirefrenassutartinai sušuktisutartinis šūksmas
balsu korisdziedāt/runāt korīizrunāts korīkordebaletskoris
spevácky súbortanečný/spevácky zborzborové volaniezborovo volať
pripevrefrenzbor
hep birlikte bağırma/söylemehep birlikte bağırmak/söylemekkorokoro şarkıları söyleyen topluluknakarat

chorus

[ˈkɔːrəs]
A. N (choruses (pl))
1. [of singers, play] → coro m; (in musical) → conjunto m
in chorusa coro
to sing in choruscantar a coro
2. (= refrain) → estribillo m
to join in the chorusunirse en el estribillo
3. (fig) a chorus of praise greeted the bookel libro fue recibido por un coro de aprobación or alabanzas
a chorus of shouts greeted thisesto fue recibido por un coro de exclamaciones
B. VT (= speak in unison) → decir a coro; (= answer) → contestar a coro
C. CPD chorus girl Ncorista f
chorus line Nlínea f de coro

chorus

[ˈkɔːrəs] n
(= singers) → chœur m
(= repeated part of song) → refrain m
(= song sung by chorus) → chœur m
[criticism, complaint] → avalanche fchorus girl ndanseuse f de revuechorus line n (in musical)troupe f

chorus

n
(= refrain)Refrain m
Chor m; (of opera)Opernchor m; (= dancers)Tanzgruppe f; she’s in the chorussie singt im Chor/sie ist bei der Tanzgruppe; in chorusim Chor; he was greeted with a chorus of good morning, sirals er hereinkam, riefen alle im Chor: Guten Morgen!
viim Chor singen/sprechen/rufen

chorus

:
chorus girl
nRevuetänzerin for -girl nt
chorus line
nRevue f

chorus

[ˈkɔːrəs]
1. n
a. (musical work, people) → coro
in chorus → in coro
b. (refrain, also) (fig) → ritornello
2. vt (answer) → rispondere in coro

chorus

(ˈkoːrəs) plural ˈchoruses noun
1. a group of singers. the festival chorus.
2. a group of singers and dancers in a musical show.
3. part of a song repeated after each verse. The audience joined in the chorus.
4. something said or shouted by a number of people together. He was greeted by a chorus of cheers.
verb
to sing or say together. The children chorused `Goodbye, Miss Smith'.
References in classic literature ?
We read some, and mean to every day," they all cried in chorus.
And here Bildad, who, with Peleg, be it known, in addition to his other offices, was one of the licensed pilots of the port --he being suspected to have got himself made a pilot in order to save the Nantucket pilot-fee to all the ships he was concerned in, for he never piloted any other craft --Bildad, I say, might now be seen actively engaged in looking over the bows for the approaching anchor, and at intervals singing what seemed a dismal stave of psalmody, to cheer the hands at the windlass, who roared forth some sort of a chorus about the girls in Booble Alley, with hearty good will.
The chorus of one of them, which ran as follows, was sung with great energy and unction:
Good old ques- tionable stories were told that made the tears run down and cavernous mouths stand wide and the round bellies shake with laughter; and questionable songs were bellowed out in a mighty chorus that drowned the boom of the tolling bells.
Each sang his indictive narrative in turn, accompanied by the whole orchestra of sixty instruments, and when this had continued for some time, and one was hoping they might come to an understanding and modify the noise, a great chorus composed entirely of maniacs would suddenly break forth, and then during two minutes, and sometimes three, I lived over again all that I suffered the time the orphan asylum burned down.
The congregation be- came more and more moved, as the pathetic tale went on, till at last the whole company broke down and joined the weeping mourners in a chorus of anguished sobs, the preacher himself giving way to his feelings, and crying in the pulpit.
and when they came to the chorus, all point to Rebecca's flag.
This they would sing, as a chorus, to words which to many would seem unmeaning jargon, but which, nevertheless, were full of meaning to themselves.
cried the chorus of gentlemen -- the anonymous gentleman who had helped to do the mischief (otherwise Mr.
The old man, in a voice that seldom rose above the howling of the wind upon the barren waste, was singing them a Christmas song -- it had been a very old song when he was a boy -- and from time to time they all joined in the chorus.
Poor Traddles - I never think of that boy but with a strange disposition to laugh, and with tears in my eyes - was a sort of chorus, in general; and affected to be convulsed with mirth at the comic parts, and to be overcome with fear when there was any passage of an alarming character in the narrative.
Again, God said, let ther be Firmament Amid the Waters, and let it divide The Waters from the Waters: and God made The Firmament, expanse of liquid, pure, Transparent, Elemental Air, diffus'd In circuit to the uttermost convex Of this great Round: partition firm and sure, The Waters underneath from those above Dividing: for as Earth, so hee the World Built on circumfluous Waters calme, in wide Crystallin Ocean, and the loud misrule Of CHAOS farr remov'd, least fierce extreames Contiguous might distemper the whole frame: And Heav'n he nam'd the Firmament: So Eev'n And Morning CHORUS sung the second Day.