chowder


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chow·der

 (chou′dər)
n.
1. A thick soup containing fish or shellfish, especially clams, and vegetables, such as potatoes and onions, in a milk or tomato base.
2. A soup similar to this seafood dish: corn chowder.

[French chaudière, stew pot, from Old French, from Late Latin caldāria; see cauldron.]

chowder

(ˈtʃaʊdə)
n
(Cookery) a thick soup or stew containing clams or fish
[C18: from French chaudière kettle, from Late Latin caldāria; see cauldron]

chow•der

(ˈtʃaʊ dər)

n.
a thick soup of clams, fish, or vegetables, usu. with potatoes, milk, and various seasonings.
[1735–45, Amer.; < French chaudière pot, kettle < Late Latin caldāria cauldron]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chowder - a thick soup or stew made with milk and bacon and onions and potatoeschowder - a thick soup or stew made with milk and bacon and onions and potatoes
soup - liquid food especially of meat or fish or vegetable stock often containing pieces of solid food
corn chowder - chowder containing corn
clam chowder - chowder containing clams
fish chowder - chowder containing fish
Translations

chowder

[ˈtʃaʊdəʳ] N (esp US) → sopa f de pescado

chowder

[ˈtʃaʊdər] nsoupe f de poisson

chowder

chowder

[ˈtʃaʊdəʳ] n (esp Am) (Culin) → zuppa di pesce
References in classic literature ?
A codfish of sixty pounds, caught in the bay, had been dissolved into the rich liquid of a chowder.
But when that smoking chowder came in, the mystery was delightfully explained.
Chowder for breakfast, and chowder for dinner, and chowder for supper, till you began to look for fish-bones coming through your clothes.
The landlord of the Spouter-Inn had recommended us to his cousin Hosea Hussey of the Try Pots, whom he asserted to be the proprietor of one of the best kept hotels in all Nantucket, and moreover he had assured us that cousin Hosea, as he called him, was famous for his chowders.
Here he acquired the art of making chowder, lobster, and one or two other sea-dishes, and, as he was fond of saying, had an opportunity of seeing the world.
He was ordered to make chowder out of the big clams that grew in the lagoon.
Well, we'll shew you how to fry fish, and make chowder.
At meal-times all fell to work upon the dishes peculiar to the Southern States, and consumed with an appetite that threatened speedy exhaustion of the victualing powers of Florida, fricasseed frogs, stuffed monkey, fish chowder, underdone
There is a narrow sand-bar running into it, with very deep water on one side, on which I helped boil a kettle of chowder, some six rods from the main shore, about the year 1824, which it has not been possible to do for twenty-five years; and, on the other hand, my friends used to listen with incredulity when I told them, that a few years later I was accustomed to fish from a boat in a secluded cove in the woods, fifteen rods from the only shore they knew, which place was long since converted into a meadow.
He doesn't--well, he doesn't belong either to the Lotos Club or to the Jerry McGeogheghan Galvanised Iron Workers' Apprentices' Left Hook Chowder Association.
As it was, with bread and potatoes and salted sardines in the house, she went out at the afternoon low tide and dug clams for a chowder.
Chowderland: Hearty Soups & Stews with Sides & Salads to Match takes the concept of the traditional chowder recipe and embellishes it, from contrasting different approaches to clam and corn chowder to outlining such different creations as a Saint Patrick's Chowder, Parsnip Chowder, Seafood Chowder, and many more.