chromatid


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Related to chromatid: chromomere

chro·ma·tid

 (krō′mə-tĭd)
n.
Either of the two daughter strands of a replicated chromosome that are joined by a single centromere and separate during cell division to become individual chromosomes.

chromatid

(ˈkrəʊmətɪd)
n
(Genetics) either of the two strands into which a chromosome divides during mitosis. They separate to form daughter chromosomes at anaphase

chro•ma•tid

(ˈkroʊ mə tɪd)

n.
either of two identical chromosomal strands into which a chromosome splits before cell division.
[1900; < Greek chrōmat- (see chromatin) + -id1]

chro·ma·tid

(krō′mə-tĭd)
Either of the two strands formed when a chromosome duplicates itself during cell division. The chromatids are joined together by a single centromere and later separate to become individual chromosomes. See more at meiosis, mitosis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chromatid - one of two identical strands into which a chromosome splits during mitosis
chromosome - a threadlike strand of DNA in the cell nucleus that carries the genes in a linear order; "humans have 22 chromosome pairs plus two sex chromosomes"
fibril, filament, strand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiber
Translations
Chromatid
References in periodicals archive ?
Proper mitosis, in turn, depends on changes in chromosome organization, such as chromosome condensation and sister chromatid cohesion.
1996) and sister chromatid exchanges (Olvera-Bello et al.
segregation, called random chromatid segregation and maximum equational
Types of structural chromosomal aberrations were classified into following groups: chromatid breaks (ctb) chromosome breaks (csb), chromatid and chromosomal gap (ctg) The final results were judged as follows: negative (-) if the frequency of aberrant cells was <5%, inconclusive ([+ or -]) if [greater than or equal to]5 % but <10 % and positive (+) if [greater than or equal to] 10 %.
Reduced expression of MAD2, BCL2, and MAP kinase activity in pig oocytes after in vitro aging are associated with defects in sister chromatid segregation during meiosis II and embryo fragmentation after activation.
The lipid peroxidation end-products malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adversely affect genome integrity, causing DNA strand breaks, formation of DNA adducts, increased frequency of sister chromatid exchange, and apoptosis (5,6).
For example, small autosomes presenting double breaks on the same chromatid and others showing gaps in both chromatids can be appreciated in Figure 2 B and D.
Among the topics are dormant replication origins, break-induced DNA replication, the mini-chromosome maintenance replicative helicase, the spatial and temporal organization of DNA replication in bacteria and eukarya, DNA replication timing, replication-fork dynamics, sister chromatid cohesion, translesion DNA polymerases, rescuing stalled or damaged replication forks, genome instability in cancer, regulating DNA replication in plants, endoreplication, the archaeology of eukaryotic DNA replication, human mitochondrial DNA replication, whether human papillomavirus infections are warts or cancer, and adenovirus DNA replication.
Furthermore, some authors have examined the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies in BD patients to understand the genetic mechanism.
High frequencies of telomeric associations, chromosome aberrations, and sister chromatid exchanges in
MX also induced a wide variety of DNA damage in mammalian cells in vitro (Jansson & Hyttinen, 1994; Maki-Paakkanen & Hakulinen, 2008) including human cells (Chang, Daniel, & Deangelo, 1991) such as sister chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (Hyttinen et al.