chronicler


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chron·i·cle

 (krŏn′ĭ-kəl)
n.
1. An extended account in prose or verse of historical events, sometimes including legendary material, presented in chronological order and without authorial interpretation or comment.
2. A detailed narrative record or report.
3. Chronicles(used with a sing. verb) See Table at Bible.
tr.v. chron·i·cled, chron·i·cling, chron·i·cles
To record in or in the form of a historical record.

[Middle English cronicle, from Anglo-Norman, alteration of Old French cronique, from Latin chronica, from Greek khronika (biblia), chronological (books), annals, neuter pl. of khronikos, of time; see chronic.]

chron′i·cler (-klər) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.chronicler - someone who writes chronicleschronicler - someone who writes chronicles  
historian, historiographer - a person who is an authority on history and who studies it and writes about it

chronicler

noun recorder, reporter, historian, narrator, scribe, diarist, annalist the chronicler of the English civil war
Translations
مُؤَرِّخ إخْباري
kronikář
kronikør
krónikaíró
annálsritari; skrásetjari
kronikár
tarihçitarihsel kayıtvak'anüvis

chronicler

[ˈkrɒnɪkləʳ] Ncronista mf

chronicler

nChronist m

chronicle

(ˈkronikl) noun
a record of (especially historical) events in order of time.
verb
to make such a record.
ˈchronicler noun
References in classic literature ?
The whale has no famous author, and whaling no famous chronicler, you will say.
And thou, O sage magician, whoever thou art, to whom it shall fall to be the chronicler of this wondrous history, forget not, I entreat thee, my good Rocinante, the constant companion of my ways and wanderings.
Plato was not, like Xenophon, a chronicler of facts; he does not appear in any of his writings to have aimed at literal accuracy.
Would you like to know the opinion of a chronicler of the fourteenth century?
We have hinted that by the side of these views of the leveling and simplifying minister, which belong to history, the chronicler is forced to recognize the lesser motives of the amorous man and jealous rival.
Figueroa, the chronicler of Mendanna's voyage, says, that on the morning the land was descried, when the Spaniards drew near the shore, there sallied forth, in rude progression, about seventy canoes, and at the same time many of the inhabitants (females I presume) made towards the ships by swimming.
Oh, a trusty comrade is always of use; and a chronicler still more so.
I hear of Sherlock everywhere since you became his chronicler.
The proverbial Englishman, we know from old chronicler Froissart, takes his pleasures sadly, and the Englishwoman goes a step further and takes her pleasures in sadness itself.
The fight within that room, had it had but a competent chronicler, would go down in the annals of Barsoom as a historic memorial to the grim ferocity of her warlike people.
All these wonders and magical effects which the chronicler has heaped up, or rather embalmed, in his recital, at the risk of rivaling the brain-born scenes of romancers; these splendors whereby night seemed vanquished and nature corrected, together with every delight and luxury combined for the satisfaction of all the senses, as well as the imagination, Fouquet did in real truth offer to his sovereign in that enchanting retreat of which no monarch could at that time boast of possessing an equal.
Remember my words, Devenham,--when our chronicler dips his pen into the ink and writes of our government, our foreign policy, at least, will be judged by our position in the far East.