chronography


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chronography

(krənˈɒɡrəfɪ)
npl -phies
1. an arrangement of past events
2. the creation of written statements in which specific letters indicate numerical values that denote a year or period in time

chronography

Obsolete, the recording or study of past events.
See also: History, Past
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References in periodicals archive ?
After a general introduction and a review of terminology, she addresses such topics as history or historical narratives: formative traditions in Karaite literature and their social functions, the interactions between the Karaites and the Protestant Hebraists in the 17th and 18th centuries, Karaite chronography in the Crimea and Eastern Europe, and the Haskalah, Hokhmat Israel, and the evolution of Karaite identity in the Russian Empire.
For example, the work variously called The Almanac of Philocalus, The Chronography of 354, or The Codex Calendar of 354, is a liturgical calendar with full-page illustrations (drawings), produced for a wealthy Roman Christian named Valentinus, by the leading calligrapher of the day, a fellow named Furius Dionysius Philocalus.
The main reason for which both Evangelos Chrysos and Andreas Gkoutzioukostas persist in claiming that "for the period up to the fourth quarter of the eighth century we have no reference in Latin or in Greek sources for Sclaviniae as concrete geographical and political units" (Chrysos 2007, 132) is to have the earliest attestation of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in the Chronography of Theophanes the Confessor.
Men's rotary Aquaspeed chronography watch - from PS299 to PS150.
After presenting in the introduction her general theoretical and methodological framework, including the key ideas of "temporality" and "power chronography," the rest of the book is organized as a series of overlapping case studies that illustrate, expand, and specify these underlying concepts.
Kempshall covers such topics as Chronography, Deliberative Rhetoric, Annals and Chronicles, and the 'Renaissance', and includes an impressive Bibliography.
BURGESS, Studies in Eusebian and Post-Eusebian Chronography.
While their emphasis is on cataloging rather than analyzing the numerous forms of chronography that have appeared over the centuries, the authors make clear that variety of style was not a "natural" evolution.
His topics include the origins of computistical chronography and its crisis in the early Middle Ages, chronology and the 12th-century Renaissance, a science of time with Roger Bacon and his successors, biblical chronology and Ptolemy's eclipses, and the life of Jesus and the emergence of scientific chronology.
The author gives us a very accurate chronography, extremely useful for all the researchers who want to get information about the European conflict that involved--almost--all the important countries of the continent at the end of the 19th century.