chryselephantine


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chrys·el·e·phan·tine

 (krĭ-sĕl′ə-făn′tēn′, -tīn′)
adj.
Made of gold and ivory, as certain pieces of sculpture or artwork in ancient Greece.

[Greek khrūselephantinos : khrūs-, khrūso-, chryso- + elephās, elephant-, ivory; see elephant.]

chryselephantine

(ˌkrɪsɛlɪˈfæntɪn)
adj
(Art Terms) (of ancient Greek statues) made of or overlaid with gold and ivory
[C19: from Greek khruselephantinos, from khrusos gold + elephas ivory; see elephant]

chryselephantine

Made or decorated with gold and ivory, in the manner of ancient Greek statues.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fair enough, but entering the lists, he is surely obligated to take also into consideration Mulligan's chryselephantine brush, which by virtue of Stephen's first mental epithet for his rival ("Chrysostomos") must be moved to the "object" column.
One single example would be enough: the eleventh century historian Kedrenos (322C) records a tradition according to which the fifth-century chryselephantine statue of Zeus, the work of Pheidias first exhibited in the Temple of Zeus in Olympia, was carried off to Constantinople (31), most probably in the years of the preparation of the city for the official dedication, where it was displayed at the Palace of Lausus, another building renowned for the vast and rich collection of statues housed within its walls (32).
Chiparus subsequently went on to experiment with the process of combining painted bronze with ivory, a technique known as chryselephantine.
For example, the famous chryselephantine statue of the god in his principal shrine at Epidaurus is described by Pausanias as "sitting on a seat, grasping a staff; the other hand he is holding above the head of the serpent; there is also a figure of a dog lying by his side.
Ivory was the centre of much attention as this material had enabled artists to revisit chryselephantine sculpture, a genre that had been first developed in Ancient Greece.
104) suggests that Pheidias' chryselephantine statue of Athena Parthenos is meant, but since this was nearly fifty feet tall Charmides would have had to be content with embracing her shin.
The death of Ferdinand Preiss in 1943 from a brain tumour was marked when his prediction that his beautiful Art Deco figures in chryselephantine would rise dramatically in value was proved right.
chryselephantine cult statue in his temple represented him sitting on a throne, holding a staff in one hand and placing the other above the head of a snake.
The intrinsic value of the materials employed predominates in the earlier model: the value of plate at an Athenian symposium, or the value of gold and ivory in the chryselephantine statues by Phidias.
The photos and reconstructions of particular sites are spectacular, but I do find the way in which the material is ordered often little short of being bizarre: why, to quote a single example, have a couple of gold masks from Mycenae on pages 116-17 but another couple so very much later on page 189, and is it really true that the chryselephantine statues from Delphi were found `in a sort of warehouse' (212)?
The Athena of the Attalid library is the most revealing example, and constitutes valuable evidence of what Pheidias's chryselephantine statue for the Parthenon was like.