churchyard


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church·yard

 (chûrch′yärd′)
n.
1. A yard adjacent to a church, especially a cemetery.
2. The ground on which a church stands.

churchyard

(ˈtʃɜːtʃˌjɑːd)
n
the grounds surrounding a church, usually used as a graveyard

church•yard

(ˈtʃɜrtʃˌyɑrd)

n.
the yard or ground adjoining a church, often used as a graveyard.
[1125–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.churchyard - the yard associated with a churchchurchyard - the yard associated with a church  
yard - a tract of land enclosed for particular activities (sometimes paved and usually associated with buildings); "they opened a repair yard on the edge of town"
Translations
فِناء الكَنيسَه
hřbitov
kirkegård
sírkert
kirkjugarîur
kilise mezarlık avlusu

churchyard

[ˈtʃɜːtʃjɑːd] Ncementerio m, campo m santo

churchyard

[ˈtʃɜːrtʃjɑːrd] ncimetière m

churchyard

nFriedhof m, → Kirchhof m (old, dial)

churchyard

[ˈtʃɜːtʃˌjɑːd] ncimitero (annesso a una chiesa)

church

(tʃəːtʃ) noun
1. a building for public Christian worship.
2. a group of Christians considered as a whole. the Catholic Church.
ˈchurchyard noun
the burial ground round a church.
References in classic literature ?
If she had, I should have felt as if I ought to do it, but Plumfield is about as gay as a churchyard, you know, and I'd rather be excused.
In accordance with this rule it may safely be assumed that the forefathers of Boston had built the first prison-house somewhere in the Vicinity of Cornhill, almost as seasonably as they marked out the first burial-ground, on Isaac Johnson's lot, and round about his grave, which subsequently became the nucleus of all the congregated sepulchres in the old churchyard of King's Chapel.
Indeed, certain of the most authentic historians of those parts, who have been careful in collecting and collating the floating facts concerning this spectre, allege that the body of the trooper having been buried in the churchyard, the ghost rides forth to the scene of battle in nightly quest of his head, and that the rushing speed with which he sometimes passes along the Hollow, like a midnight blast, is owing to his being belated, and in a hurry to get back to the churchyard before daybreak.
I seemed literally to be running a race with some confusion to which he was about to reduce me, but I felt that he had got in first when, before we had even entered the churchyard, he threw out--
put up thy grave-stone, too, within the churchyard, and come hither, till we marry thee
They were carrying young Gordon to the churchyard to bury him.
whence they were borne to Zermatt and buried in the churchyard.
Cobb was mother only to a little headstone in the churchyard, where reposed "Sarah Ann, beloved daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah Cobb, aged seventeen months;" but the name of mother was better than nothing, and served at any rate as a reminder of her woman's crown of blessedness.
I cannot tell what sentiment haunted the quite solitary churchyard, with its inscribed headstone; its gate, its two trees, its low horizon, girdled by a broken wall, and its newly-risen crescent, attesting the hour of eventide.
Before we were out of the churchyard she broke from me and ran back.
Cruncher did not assist at the closing sports, but had remained behind in the churchyard, to confer and condole with the undertakers.
If we were not perfectly convinced that Hamlet's Father died before the play began, there would be nothing more remarkable in his taking a stroll at night, in an easterly wind, upon his own ramparts, than there would be in any other middle-aged gentleman rashly turning out after dark in a breezy spot -- say Saint Paul's Churchyard for instance -- literally to astonish his son's weak mind.