circle


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circle

cir·cle

 (sûr′kəl)
n.
1.
a. A plane curve everywhere equidistant from a given fixed point, the center.
b. A planar region bounded by a circle.
c. Something, such as a ring, shaped like such a plane curve.
2. A circular or nearly circular course, circuit, or orbit: a satellite's circle around the earth.
3. A traffic circle.
4. A series or process that finishes at its starting point or continuously repeats itself; a cycle.
5. A group of people sharing an interest, activity, or achievement: well-known in artistic circles.
6. A territorial or administrative division, especially of a province, in some European countries.
7. A sphere of influence or interest; domain.
8. Logic A vicious circle.
v. cir·cled, cir·cling, cir·cles
v.tr.
1. To make or form a circle around: The hedge circles the fountain.
2. To move in a circle around: The ship circled the island.
v.intr.
To move in a circle. See Synonyms at turn.
Idiom:
circle the wagons
To take a defensive position; become defensive.

[Middle English cercle, from Old French, from Latin circulus, diminutive of circus, circle, from Greek kirkos, krikos; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

cir′cler (-klər) n.

circle

(ˈsɜːkəl)
n
1. (Mathematics) maths a closed plane curve every point of which is equidistant from a given fixed point, the centre. Equation: (x –h)2 + (y –k)2 = r2 where r is the radius and (h, k) are the coordinates of the centre; area πr2; circumference: 2πr
2. (Mathematics) the figure enclosed by such a curve
3. (Theatre) theatre the section of seats above the main level of the auditorium, usually comprising the dress circle and the upper circle
4. something formed or arranged in the shape of a circle
5. a group of people sharing an interest, activity, upbringing, etc; set: golf circles; a family circle.
6. a domain or area of activity, interest, or influence
7. a circuit
8. a process or chain of events or parts that forms a connected whole; cycle
9. (Physical Geography) a parallel of latitude. See also great circle, small circle
10. the ring of a circus
11. (Archaeology) one of a number of Neolithic or Bronze Age rings of standing stones, such as Stonehenge, found in Europe and thought to be associated with some form of ritual or astronomical measurement
12. (Hockey (Field & Ice)) hockey See striking circle
13. (Logic) a circular argument. See vicious circle2
14. come full circle to arrive back at one's starting point. See also vicious circle
15. go round in circles run round in circles to engage in energetic but fruitless activity
vb
16. to move in a circle (around): we circled the city by car.
17. (tr) to enclose in a circle; encircle
[C14: from Latin circulus a circular figure, from circus ring, circle]
ˈcircler n

cir•cle

(ˈsɜr kəl)

n., v. -cled, -cling. n.
1. a closed plane curve consisting of all points at a given distance from a point within it called the center.
2. the portion of a plane bounded by such a curve.
3. any circular or ringlike object, formation, or arrangement: a circle of dancers.
4. a ring, circlet, or crown.
5. the ring of a circus.
6. a section of seats in a theater. Compare dress circle, family circle (def. 2).
7. the area within which something acts, exerts influence, etc.; realm; sphere: a wide circle of influence.
8. a series ending where it began or forming a connected whole; cycle.
9. an argument ostensibly proving a conclusion but actually assuming the conclusion as a premise; vicious circle.
10. a number of persons bound by a common tie; coterie: a circle of friends.
11. an administrative division, esp. of a province.
12. a parallel of latitude.
13. a sphere or orb: the circle of the earth.
v.t.
14. to enclose in a circle; encircle: Circle the correct answer.
15. to rotate or revolve around: He circled the house cautiously.
16. to bypass; evade: The ship carefully circled the iceberg.
v.i.
17. to move in a circle or circuit.
Idioms:
come full circle, to find oneself back where one started.
[1275–1325; Middle English cercle < Old French < Latin circulus=circ(us) (see circus) + -ulus -ule]
cir′cler, n.
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circle
The area of a circle is πr2. The length of the circumference is 2πr.

cir·cle

(sûr′kəl)
A closed curve whose points are all on the same plane and at the same distance from a fixed point (the center).

Circle

 Examples: circle of action, 1752; of admirers, 1793; of acquaintances, 1752; of doctrine, 1531; of fallacy, 1646; of foliages, 1713; of glory, 1595; literary circle; circle of onlookers, 1875; of pleasures, 1759; of passion, 1768; of possibilities, 1644; of probability, 1851; of sciences, 1854; of stars, 1611.

circle


Past participle: circled
Gerund: circling

Imperative
circle
circle
Present
I circle
you circle
he/she/it circles
we circle
you circle
they circle
Preterite
I circled
you circled
he/she/it circled
we circled
you circled
they circled
Present Continuous
I am circling
you are circling
he/she/it is circling
we are circling
you are circling
they are circling
Present Perfect
I have circled
you have circled
he/she/it has circled
we have circled
you have circled
they have circled
Past Continuous
I was circling
you were circling
he/she/it was circling
we were circling
you were circling
they were circling
Past Perfect
I had circled
you had circled
he/she/it had circled
we had circled
you had circled
they had circled
Future
I will circle
you will circle
he/she/it will circle
we will circle
you will circle
they will circle
Future Perfect
I will have circled
you will have circled
he/she/it will have circled
we will have circled
you will have circled
they will have circled
Future Continuous
I will be circling
you will be circling
he/she/it will be circling
we will be circling
you will be circling
they will be circling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been circling
you have been circling
he/she/it has been circling
we have been circling
you have been circling
they have been circling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been circling
you will have been circling
he/she/it will have been circling
we will have been circling
you will have been circling
they will have been circling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been circling
you had been circling
he/she/it had been circling
we had been circling
you had been circling
they had been circling
Conditional
I would circle
you would circle
he/she/it would circle
we would circle
you would circle
they would circle
Past Conditional
I would have circled
you would have circled
he/she/it would have circled
we would have circled
you would have circled
they would have circled

circle

A balcony or tier in the auditorium. The dress circle, usually the most expensive seats where spectators used to dress formally, is the first tier.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.circle - ellipse in which the two axes are of equal lengthcircle - ellipse in which the two axes are of equal length; a plane curve generated by one point moving at a constant distance from a fixed point; "he calculated the circumference of the circle"
circle of curvature, osculating circle - the circle that touches a curve (on the concave side) and whose radius is the radius of curvature
circlet - a small circle
equator - a circle dividing a sphere or other surface into two usually equal and symmetrical parts
arc - a continuous portion of a circle
ellipse, oval - a closed plane curve resulting from the intersection of a circular cone and a plane cutting completely through it; "the sums of the distances from the foci to any point on an ellipse is constant"
epicycle - a circle that rolls around (inside or outside) another circle; generates an epicycloid or hypocycloid
2.circle - an unofficial association of people or groupscircle - an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot"
social group - people sharing some social relation
car pool - a small group of car drivers who arrange to take turns driving while the others are passengers
clique, coterie, ingroup, inner circle, camp, pack - an exclusive circle of people with a common purpose
cohort - a band of warriors (originally a unit of a Roman Legion)
confederacy, conspiracy - a group of conspirators banded together to achieve some harmful or illegal purpose
Four Hundred - the exclusive social set of a city
horsey set, horsy set - a set of people sharing a devotion to horses and horseback riding and horse racing
jet set - a set of rich and fashionable people who travel widely for pleasure
party, company - a band of people associated temporarily in some activity; "they organized a party to search for food"; "the company of cooks walked into the kitchen"
3.circle - something approximating the shape of a circle; "the chairs were arranged in a circle"
shape, form - the spatial arrangement of something as distinct from its substance; "geometry is the mathematical science of shape"
4.circle - movement once around a course; "he drove an extra lap just for insurance"
locomotion, travel - self-propelled movement
pace lap - the first lap of a car race that prepares the cars for a fast start
lap of honour, victory lap - a lap by the winning person or team run to celebrate the victory
5.circle - a road junction at which traffic streams circularly around a central islandcircle - a road junction at which traffic streams circularly around a central island; "the accident blocked all traffic at the rotary"
junction - the place where two or more things come together
road, route - an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation
6.circle - street names for flunitrazepan
flunitrazepan, Rohypnol - a depressant and tranquilizer (trade name Rohypnol) often used in the commission of sexual assault; legally available in Europe and Mexico and Colombia
7.circle - a curved section or tier of seats in a hall or theater or opera house; usually the first tier above the orchestra; "they had excellent seats in the dress circle"
seating, seating area, seating room, seats - an area that includes places where several people can sit; "there is seating for 40 students in this classroom"
theater, theatre, house - a building where theatrical performances or motion-picture shows can be presented; "the house was full"
8.circle - any circular or rotating mechanism; "the machine punched out metal circles"
disk, disc - a flat circular plate
rotating mechanism - a mechanism that rotates
Verb1.circle - travel around something; "circle the globe"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
circumambulate, walk around - walk around something
circumnavigate, compass - travel around, either by plane or ship; "We compassed the earth"
circle around, circle round, revolve around - move around in a circular motion; "The Earth revolves around the Sun"
2.circle - move in circles
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
orb, orbit, revolve - move in an orbit; "The moon orbits around the Earth"; "The planets are orbiting the sun"; "electrons orbit the nucleus"
troll - circulate, move around
loop - fly loops, perform a loop; "the stunt pilot looped his plane"
loop - move in loops; "The bicycle looped around the tree"
3.circle - form a circle around; "encircle the errors"
shape, form - give shape or form to; "shape the dough"; "form the young child's character"

circle

noun
1. ring, round, band, disc, loop, hoop, cordon, perimeter, halo The flag was red with a large white circle. The monument consists of a circle of gigantic stones.
3. sphere, world, area, range, field, scene, orbit, realm, milieu She moved only in the most exalted circles.
verb
1. go round, ring, surround, belt, curve, enclose, encompass, compass, envelop, encircle, circumscribe, hem in, gird, circumnavigate, enwreath This is the ring road that circles the city.
2. wheel, spiral, revolve, rotate, whirl, pivot There were two helicopters circling around.

circle

noun
1. A closed plane curve everywhere equidistant from a fixed point or something shaped like this:
Archaic: orb.
2. A course, process, or journey that ends where it began or repeats itself:
3. A group of people sharing an interest, activity, or achievement:
4. A particular social group:
Informal: bunch, gang.
5. A sphere of activity, experience, study, or interest:
Slang: bag.
verb
1. To shut in on all sides:
2. To move or cause to move in circles or around an axis:
Translations
حَلَقَةٌ مِنَ الأصْدِقاءدَائِرَةدائِرَهشُرْفَةُ المَسْرَح الدّائِرِيَّهشَكْلٌ دائِري
орбита
kruhkružniceobklopovatskupinazakroužkovat
cirkelkredskredselave en cirkelbalkon
cirklorondo
ring
ympyräkaarikiertääpiiriympäröidä
krugkružnica
bekarikázerkélygömbkörkörbejár
lingkaran
hringurklíka, hópurmynda hringsvalirteikna/gera hring
circuluscoronaorbis
apibrėžtiapskritimasbūrelisskritulys
aplisaprindasaptvertapvilkt aplibalkons
cerc
kružnicakruh
krogkrožitiobkrožiti
cirkelkretsring
วงกลม
dairedaire çizmekdaire içine almakdönmekgrup
hình tròn

circle

[ˈsɜːkl]
A. N
1. (gen) → círculo m
to stand in a circleformar un corro
to come full circlevolver al punto de partida
to go round in circlesdar vueltas sobre lo mismo, no avanzar
it had us running round in circlesnos tuvo dando vueltas sin orden ni concierto
see also vicious
2. (= set of people) → círculo m, grupo m
John and his circleJuan y sus amigos, Juan y su peña
in certain circlesen ciertos medios
in business circlesen el mundo de los negocios
the family circleel círculo familiar
to move in fashionable circlesfrecuentar los ambientes que están de moda
an inner circle of ministersun grupo de ministros que ostentan mayor poder
she moves in wealthy circlesfrecuenta la buena sociedad
3. (Brit) (Theat) → anfiteatro m
B. VT
1. (= surround) → cercar, rodear; (= move round) → girar alrededor de, dar vueltas alrededor de
the lion circled its preyel león se movió alrededor de la presa
the cosmonaut circled the earthel cosmonauta dio la vuelta a la tierra
the aircraft circled the town twiceel avión dio dos vueltas sobre la ciudad
2. (= draw round) → poner un círculo alrededor de, rodear con un círculo
C. VIdar vueltas

circle

[ˈsɜːrkəl]
n
(= shape) → cercle m
(= ring) → cercle m
to go round in circles, to go around in circles (not achieve anything)tourner en rond
to come full circle, to turn full circle → revenir à son point de départ
(= group) [people, friends] → cercle m
(in cinema, theatre)balcon m
vi [aircraft, bird, pilot] → faire des cercles, décrire des cercles
vt
(= surround) → entourer, encercler
(= fly round) [bird, plane] (once)faire un cercle au-dessus de, décrire un cercle au-dessus de; (more than once)faire des cercles au-dessus de, décrire des cercles au-dessus de
(= move round) [+ person, animal] → tourner autour de

circle

n
Kreis m; to stand in a circleim Kreis stehen; to go round in ever decreasing circles (lit)Spiralen drehen; (fig)sich unablässig im Kreis drehen; to have come or turned full circle (lit)sich ganz herumgedreht haben, eine Volldrehung gemacht haben; (fig)wieder da sein, wo man angefangen hat; we’re just going round in circles (fig)wir bewegen uns nur im Kreise; to come full circle (fig)zum Ausgangspunkt zurückkehren; things have come full circleder Kreis hat sich geschlossen; when the seasons have come full circlewenn sich der Kreis der Jahreszeiten schließt
(of hills etc)Ring m, → Kette f; (round the eyes) → Ring m (→ round unter +dat); (in gymnastics) → Welle f; a Celtic stone circleein keltischer Steinkreis
(Brit Theat) → Rang m ? dress circle, upper circle
(= group of persons)Kreis m, → Zirkel m (geh); a close circle of friendsein enger Freundeskreis; in political circlesin politischen Kreisen; the family circleder engste Familienkreis; the whole family circledie ganze Familie; he’s moving in different circles nower verkehrt jetzt in anderen Kreisen
vt
(= surround)umgeben
(= move around)kreisen um; the enemy circled the townder Feind kreiste die Stadt ein
(= draw a circle round)einen Kreis or Kringel machen um; he circled several of the addresseser machte einen Kreis um mehrere der Anschriften; circled in redrot umkringelt
vi (= fly in a circle)kreisen

circle

[ˈsɜːkl]
1. n (gen) → cerchio; (of friends) → circolo; (in theatre, cinema) → galleria
great/small circle (Geom) → cerchio massimo/minore
to stand in a circle → mettersi in cerchio
she moves in wealthy circles → frequenta l'alta società
the family circle → la cerchia familiare
to come full circle (fig) → ritornare al punto di partenza
to go round in circles (fam) → girare sempre attorno allo stesso punto
2. vt (surround) → accerchiare, circondare; (move round) → girare attorno or intorno a; (draw round) → segnare con un cerchio, cerchiare
3. vigirare in circolo

circle

(ˈsəːkl) noun
1. a figure (O) bounded by one line, every point on which is equally distant from the centre.
2. something in the form of a circle. She was surrounded by a circle of admirers.
3. a group of people. a circle of close friends; wealthy circles.
4. a balcony in a theatre etc. We sat in the circle at the opera.
verb
1. to move in a circle round something. The chickens circled round the farmer who was bringing their food.
2. to draw a circle round. Please circle the word you think is wrong.

circle

دَائِرَة kruh cirkel Kreis κύκλος círculo ympyrä cercle krug cerchio cirkel sirkel koło círculo круг cirkel วงกลม daire hình tròn 圆形

cir·cle

n. círculo, circunferencia.

circle

n círculo; dark circles under one’s eyes ojeras; vicious — círculo vicioso
References in classic literature ?
On christmas night, a dozen girls piled onto the bed which was the dress circle, and sat before the blue and yellow chintz curtains in a most flattering state of expectancy.
It seemed to her that between herself and all the other people in the world, a wall had been built up and that she was living just on the edge of some warm inner circle of life that must be quite open and under- standable to others.
Suddenly Tom, who, with Professor Bumper, was in the lead, uttered a cry, as he held his torch above his head and flashed it about in a circle.
Beyond the pond, on the slope that climbed to the cornfield, there was, faintly marked in the grass, a great circle where the Indians used to ride.
There was now an apparent disposition to relax; to widen the circle of confidences and give a more general tone to the conversation.
He had seated himself more within the circle of light, where the frequent, uneasy glances of his guests were better enabled to separate the natural expression of his face from the artificial terrors of the war paint.
In the first flush of gratitude to their father for this opportune holiday, something of harmony had been restored to the family circle that had of late been shaken by discord.
Clergymen, judges, statesmen,--the wisest, calmest, holiest persons of their day stood in the inner circle round about the gallows, loudest to applaud the work of blood, latest to confess themselves miserably deceived.
Some authors, indeed, do far more than this, and indulge themselves in such confidential depths of revelation as could fittingly be addressed only and exclusively to the one heart and mind of perfect sympathy; as if the printed book, thrown at large on the wide world, were certain to find out the divided segment of the writer's own nature, and complete his circle of existence by bringing him into communion with it.
The schoolmaster is generally a man of some importance in the female circle of a rural neighborhood; being considered a kind of idle, gentlemanlike personage, of vastly superior taste and accomplishments to the rough country swains, and, indeed, inferior in learning only to the parson.
Poor Douglas, before his death--when it was in sight--committed to me the manuscript that reached him on the third of these days and that, on the same spot, with immense effect, he began to read to our hushed little circle on the night of the fourth.
He made no advances whatever; appeared to have no desire to enlarge the circle of his acquaintances.