circulation


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Related to circulation: circulatory system, Blood circulation, JACC

cir·cu·la·tion

 (sûr′kyə-lā′shən)
n.
1. Movement in a circle or circuit, especially the movement of blood through bodily vessels as a result of the heart's pumping action.
2.
a. Movement or passage through a system of vessels, as of water through pipes; flow.
b. Free movement or passage.
3. The passing of something, such as money or news, from place to place or person to person.
4.
a. The condition of being passed about and widely known; distribution.
b. Dissemination of printed material, especially copies of newspapers or magazines, among readers.
c. The number of copies of a publication sold or distributed.

circulation

(ˌsɜːkjʊˈleɪʃən)
n
1. (Physiology) the transport of oxygenated blood through the arteries to the capillaries, where it nourishes the tissues, and the return of oxygen-depleted blood through the veins to the heart, where the cycle is renewed
2. (Botany) the flow of sap through a plant
3. any movement through a closed circuit
4. the spreading or transmission of something to a wider group of people or area
5. (of air and water) free movement within an area or volume
6. (Journalism & Publishing)
a. the distribution of newspapers, magazines, etc
b. the number of copies of an issue of such a publication that are distributed
7. (Library Science & Bibliography) library science
a. a book loan, as from a library lending department
b. each loan transaction of a particular book
c. the total issue of library books over a specified period
8. (Banking & Finance) a rare term for circulating medium
9. (Banking & Finance) (of currency) serving as a medium of exchange
10. (of people) active in a social or business context

cir•cu•la•tion

(ˌsɜr kyəˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of circulating.
2. the continuous movement of blood through the heart and blood vessels, maintained chiefly by the action of the heart.
3. any similar circuit, passage, or flow, as of the sap in plants or air currents in a room.
4. the transmission or passage of anything from place to place or person to person; dissemination.
5. the distribution of copies of a periodical among readers.
6. the number of items distributed over a given period, as copies of a periodical sold by a publisher, or books lent by a library.
7. the total of coins, notes, bills, etc., in use as money.
Idioms:
in circulation, participating actively in social or business life.
[1645–55]

cir·cu·la·tion

(sûr′kyə-lā′shən)
The flow of blood as it is pumped by the heart to all the tissues of the body and then back to the heart. Blood that is rich in oxygen is carried away from the heart by the arteries, and blood that is low in oxygen is returned to the heart by the veins. Nutrients and waste products are exchanged between the blood and the tissues of the body through the circulation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.circulation - the dissemination of copies of periodicals (as newspapers or magazines)
airing, dissemination, public exposure, spreading - the opening of a subject to widespread discussion and debate
2.circulation - movement through a circuit; especially the movement of blood through the heart and blood vessels
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals
blood pressure - the pressure of the circulating blood against the walls of the blood vessels; results from the systole of the left ventricle of the heart; sometimes measured for a quick evaluation of a person's health; "adult blood pressure is considered normal at 120/80 where the first number is the systolic pressure and the second is the diastolic pressure"
systemic circulation - circulation that supplies blood to all the body except to the lungs
pulmonary circulation - circulation of blood between the heart and the lungs
vitelline circulation - circulation of blood between the embryo and the yolk sac
3.circulation - (library science) the count of books that are loaned by a library over a specified period
library science - the study of the principles and practices of library administration
count - the total number counted; "a blood count"
4.circulation - number of copies of a newspaper or magazine that are sold; "by increasing its circulation the newspaper hoped to increase its advertising"
count - the total number counted; "a blood count"
5.circulation - free movement or passage (as of cytoplasm within a cell or sap through a plant); "ocean circulation is an important part of global climate"; "a fan aids air circulation"
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
change of location, travel - a movement through space that changes the location of something
6.circulation - the spread or transmission of something (as news or money) to a wider group or area
spreading, spread - act of extending over a wider scope or expanse of space or time
recirculation - circulation again

circulation

noun
1. distribution, currency, readership The paper once had the highest circulation of any daily in the country.
2. bloodstream, blood flow Anyone with circulation problems should seek medical advice before flying.
3. flow, circling, motion, rotation Fit a ventilated lid to allow circulation of air.
4. spread, distribution, transmission, dissemination measures inhibiting the circulation of useful information

circulation

noun
1. Circular movement around a point or about an axis:
2. The passing out or spreading about of something:
Translations
إنْتِشارتَوْزِيع
oběh
cirkulationomløb
kierto
cirkulacija
keringésterjesztés
hringrás; blóîrás; útbreiîsla
循環
순환
kroženjenakladaobtok krvi
cirkulering
การหมุนเวียน
sự lưu thông

circulation

[ˌsɜːkjʊˈleɪʃən] N
1. (gen) → circulación f
to withdraw sth from circulationretirar algo de la circulación
to put into circulationponer en circulación
he's back in circulationse está dejando ver otra vez
2. (= number of papers printed) → tirada f
3. (Med) she has poor circulationtiene mala circulación

circulation

[ˌsɜːrkjʊˈleɪʃən] n
[blood] → circulation f
[newspaper] → tirage m
to be in circulation [money] → être en circulation
to be out of circulation, to be withdrawn from circulation [money] → être hors de la circulation, être retiré(e) de la circulation
to be out of circulation [person] (gen)avoir disparu de la circulation; [prisoner] → être en prison

circulation

n
(= act of circulating) (Med) → Kreislauf m, → Zirkulation f; (of traffic)Ablauf m, → Fluss m; (of money also)Umlauf m; (of news, rumour)Kursieren nt; to have poor circulationKreislaufstörungen haben; to put notes into circulationBanknoten in Umlauf bringen; this coin was withdrawn from or taken out of circulationdiese Münze wurde aus dem Verkehr gezogen; new words which come into circulationWörter, die neu in Umlauf kommen; he’s back in circulation now (inf)er mischt wieder mit (inf); to be out of circulation (inf) (person)von der Bildfläche or in der Versenkung verschwunden sein; (criminal, politician)aus dem Verkehr gezogen worden sein; the ideas then in circulationdie Ideen, die damals im Schwang(e) waren
(of newspaper etc)Auflage(nziffer) f; for private circulationzum privaten Gebrauch

circulation

[ˌsɜːkjʊˈleɪʃn] n (gen) → circolazione f; (of news) → diffusione f; (of newspaper) → tiratura
she has poor circulation (Med) → ha una cattiva circolazione
to withdraw sth from circulation → togliere or ritirare qc dalla circolazione
he's back in circulation (fam) → è tornato in circolazione

circulate

(ˈsəːkjuleit) verb
1. to (cause to) go round in a fixed path coming back to a starting-point. Blood circulates through the body.
2. to (cause to) spread or pass around (news etc). There's a rumour circulating that she is getting married.
ˌcircuˈlation noun
ˈcirculatory (-lə-) adjective

circulation

تَوْزِيع oběh cirkulation Kreislauf κυκλοφορία circulación kierto circulation cirkulacija circolazione 循環 순환 verspreiding sirkulasjon krążenie circulação циркуляция cirkulering การหมุนเวียน kan dolaşımı sự lưu thông 循环

cir·cu·la·tion

n. circulación;
___ ratevolumen circulatorio por minuto;
peripheral ______ periférica;
poor ___mala ___.

circulation

n circulación f; collateral — circulación colateral; extracorporeal — circulación extracorpórea; fetal — circulación fetal; pulmonary — circulación pulmonar; systemic — circulación sistémica
References in classic literature ?
Even so," replied the stranger, making diligent use of his triangular castor, to produce a circulation in the close air of the woods, and leaving his hearers in doubt to which of the young man's questions he responded; when, however, he had cooled his face, and recovered his breath, he continued, "I hear you are riding to William Henry; as I am journeying thitherward myself, I concluded good company would seem consistent to the wishes of both parties.
It is a way I have of driving off the spleen, and regulating the circulation.
Of late I had been training him for journalism, for the time seemed about right for a start in the newspaper line; nothing big, but just a small weekly for experimental circulation in my civilization- nurseries.
Now my opinion is, that it came into circulation principally on account of her sometimes saying, at the school, that if she was a lady she would like to do so-and-so for her uncle - don't you see?
At last, me and Compeyson was both committed for felony - on a charge of putting stolen notes in circulation - and there was other charges behind.
Shelley was once a private person whose name had no more universal meaning than my own, and so were Byron and Cromwell and Shakespeare; yet now their names are facts as stubborn as the Rocky Mountains, or the National Gallery, or the circulation of the blood.
It bein' a cold morning, and me havin' a poor and common circulation, would it be looked on as a liberty if I was to cut a slide here or take a turn in the corner all to myself?
In 1879 the New York telephone directory was a small card, showing two hundred and fifty-two names; but now it has grown to be an eight-hundred-page quarterly, with a circulation of half a million, and requiring twenty drays, forty horses, and four hundred men to do the work of distribution.
But if it be asked how it happens that the blood in the veins, flowing in this way continually into the heart, is not exhausted, and why the arteries do not become too full, since all the blood which passes through the heart flows into them, I need only mention in reply what has been written by a physician 1 of England, who has the honor of having broken the ice on this subject, and of having been the first to teach that there are many small passages at the extremities of the arteries, through which the blood received by them from the heart passes into the small branches of the veins, whence it again returns to the heart; so that its course amounts precisely to a perpetual circulation.
By multipying the means of gratification, by promoting the introduction and circulation of the precious metals, those darling objects of human avarice and enterprise, it serves to vivify and invigorate the channels of industry, and to make them flow with greater activity and copiousness.
A fourth and still more important consideration is, that as almost every State will, on one side or other, be a frontier, and will thus find, in regard to its safety, an inducement to make some sacrifices for the sake of the general protection; so the States which lie at the greatest distance from the heart of the Union, and which, of course, may partake least of the ordinary circulation of its benefits, will be at the same time immediately contiguous to foreign nations, and will consequently stand, on particular occasions, in greatest need of its strength and resources.
He was handicapped in his flight by the weight of the girl whose legs would but scarce bear her weight, to say nothing of maintaining her in rapid flight, for the tightly drawn bonds that had been about her ankles for so long had stopped circulation and partially paralyzed her extremities.