circumscriptive


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cir·cum·scrip·tion

 (sûr′kəm-skrĭp′shən)
n.
1. The act of circumscribing or the state of being circumscribed.
2. Something, such as a limit or restriction, that circumscribes.
3. A circumscribed space or area.
4. A circular inscription, as on a medallion.

[Latin circumscrīptiō, circumscrīptiōn-, from circumscrīptus, past participle of circumscrībere, to circumscribe; see circumscribe.]

cir′cum·scrip′tive adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers are constantly cautioned by human research ethics committees that indigenous people may be vulnerable, coercible, naturally circumscriptive and unused to occupying agentive positions in their everyday lives.
Much more than a recontextualization of current events within a Fourierist perspective, Shaw here exacts a politically significant modification upon a point of theory, about which Fourier had himself remained circumscriptive.
Nevertheless, a subtle political critique of circumscriptive ideas about Aboriginal identity inform the way in which Perkins' essay both differentiates and correlates the practice of a 'remote', 'rural' and an 'urban' Indigenous artist.
45) However, this is where the story likewise ends up revealing a self-serving circumscriptive bias.