circumstellar

cir·cum·stel·lar

 (sûr′kəm-stĕl′ər)
adj.
Revolving around or surrounding a star.

circumstellar

(ˌsɜːkəmˈstɛlə)
adj
(Astronomy) surrounding, or revolving around, a star
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References in periodicals archive ?
a) nonsphericity of stellar shape, b) the eclipses of a hot star within a binary system, c) scattering in a nonspherical circumstellar envelope by gas flux.
The classic problem in the formation of high-mass stars is that, for all stars above ~20 Msun, the outward force exerted by the stars radiation on the dusty circumstellar gas should be capable of reversing or halting accretion flows.
Thus, many astronomers seek extraterrestrial life in what's called the circumstellar habitable zone, the narrow band around the sun in which liquid water can exist.
3-cm wavelengths and is used for observations of interstellar and circumstellar molecules, pulsars, quasars and active galaxies.
A protoplanetary disk is a circumstellar disk of dense gas that surrounds a newly formed star.
7 GHz methanol masers are an exclusive tracer of an early stage of massive star formation but their exact location in the circumstellar environment is still a matter of much debate.
Topics include the relation between magnetic energy and helicity, the hydrodynamics of colliding circumstellar bubbles, the stability of cosmic ray precursors, supernova remnants as the source of galactic cosmic rays, and polarimeters for HARPS and X-shooter.
Lone Signal will provide anyone with an Internet connection the opportunity to compose and transmit messages to stars suspected to harbor habitable planets orbiting within their circumstellar habitable zones - otherwise referred to as "goldilocks zones.
From observing the star's inferred excess emissions provided by the NASA Astrophysics Data System, the conclusion was reached that FX Vel has a oscillations circumstellar disk made up of hot dust that ranges in density throughout the disk.
The planet candidate around HD 100546 was detected as a faint blob located in the circumstellar disc revealed, thanks to the NACO adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope combined with pioneering data analysis techniques.
Until then, the protostar shines from the heat energy released by the gas that continues to fall onto it, much of which originates in a rotating circumstellar disk.
A possible explanation of why the star has brightened less than the nebula in the latter part of 2011 is that, while the star has been brightening and illuminating the nebula, light coming towards us from the star may have been partially obscured by either dust clouds close to the star or the inner edge of the thick circumstellar disc.