cisalpine


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cis·al·pine

 (sĭs-ăl′pīn′)
adj.
Relating to, living on, or coming from the southern side of the Alps.

[Latin Cisalpīnus : cis-, cis- + alpīnus, alpine; see alpine.]

cisalpine

(sɪsˈælpaɪn)
adj
1. (Physical Geography) on this (the southern) side of the Alps, as viewed from Rome
2. (Roman Catholic Church) relating to a movement in the Roman Catholic Church to minimize the authority of the pope and to emphasize the independence of branches of the Church. Compare ultramontane2

cis•al•pine

(sɪsˈæl paɪn, -pɪn)

adj.
on this (the Roman or south) side of the Alps.
[1535–45; < Latin Cisalpīnus=cis- cis- + Alpīnus Alpine]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cisalpine - on the Italian or Roman side of the Alpscisalpine - on the Italian or Roman side of the Alps; "ancient cisalpine Gaul included an area south and east of the Alps"
cismontane - on this (the speaker's) side of the mountains; "a contest in Virginia between a cismontane and a tramontane people"
Translations

cisalpine

adjzisalpin
References in periodicals archive ?
45) As one of the leading representatives of the liberal Catholic Cisalpine Club, Lingard, however, questioned the infallibility of the pope and his temporal rights in England and denied clerical authority over the laity.
The book under review here, a collection of essays on the Batavian Republic (the Netherlands), the Helvetic Republic (Switzerland), and the various revolutionary regimes in Italy--especially the largest and most durable of them, the Cisalpine Republic--emphasizes constitutional theory, parliamentary practice, and the public sphere.
1-19: l'idee d'un modele importe a partir de Gaule Cisalpine est aujourd'hui abandonnee au profit d'une evolution complexe liee au depart au forum romain.
A few months after, Brutus accepted from Caesar a most important command, that of Cisalpine Gaul, while Cato, Scipio and Labienus, at the head of the Republican party, were in arms against Caesar, and Cicero, Marcellus, and other eminent men on the same side had gone into retirement or exile.
In 1743, the Kingdom of Sardinia was united with Piedmont (North-West Italy), forming a modern Italian foundations of the future state, and after the peace of Campo-Formio (1797) (Procacci, 1975: 254), Napoleon Bonaparte will draw the Cisalpine Republic and the Republic of Liguria, Austria recognizing the new geopolitical reality within the Peace Treaty of Luneville (1801) (Salvatorelli, 1939: 514).
He served as a legatus pro praetore with Caesar in Gaul and was appointed governor of Cisalpine Gaul in 51 BC.
In 387 BC he led an army of Cisalpine Gauls in the attack on Rome and captured most of the city.
Although these changes were regarded by the people of Venice as a long awaited revolution to be accompanied by joyful demonstrations, their victory was short-lived; on October 17,1797, Napoleon signed the Treaty of Campo Formio, whereby Venice was given to Austria, neglecting the pleas by the new democratic Venetian government (of which Lucilio is a member) to allow them to join the Cisalpine Republic.
23) Around the same principle of democracy were shaped the autonomy of Gaetano Salvemini, the free regionalism of Oliviero Zuccarini, the communitarian federalism of Adriano Olivetti or, later on, the fiscal federalism, while the regionalist approach of an ideological and political trend could be found in the federalism of the North League, in the Independent Sicilian movement, in the Cisalpine movement and in the federalism of the "red regions".
It marked the boundary between Italy, as controlled by Rome, and the Roman province of Cisalpine Gaul.
ASM, Ministero degli Esteri I Divisione (Marescalchi), 10 (5): letter from Marseilles dated December 19, 1800, addressed to Ferdinando Marescalchi, ambassador to Paris of the Cisalpine Republic, and signed by Luigi Marescalchi, compositore di musica del Gran Teatro, e Francesco Marescalchi, Rue des Harpies chez Martin Caffettier, n.