citation


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ci·ta·tion

 (sī-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of citing.
2.
a. A quotation of or explicit reference to a source for substantiation, as in a scholarly paper.
b. Law A reference to a previous court decision or other authority for a point of law, usually by case title and other information.
3. Enumeration or mention, as of facts, especially:
a. An official commendation for meritorious action, especially in military service: a citation for bravery.
b. A formal statement of the accomplishments of one being honored with an academic degree.
4. An official summons, especially one calling for appearance in court.

ci·ta′tion·al adj.
ci′ta·to′ry (sī′tə-tôr′ē) adj.

citation

(saɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the quoting of a book or author in support of a fact
2. a passage or source cited for this purpose
3. a listing or recounting, as of facts
4. (Military) an official commendation or award, esp for bravery or outstanding service, work, etc, usually in the form of a formal statement made in public
5. (Law) law
a. an official summons to appear in court
b. the document containing such a summons
6. (Law) law the quoting of decided cases to serve as guidance to a court
citatory adj

ci•ta•tion

(saɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of citing or quoting.
2. a reference to an authority or a precedent, esp. in law.
3. a passage cited; quotation.
4.
a. mention of a soldier or a unit in official dispatches, usu. for gallantry.
b. an award, decoration, or the like, for exceptional military bravery.
5. any award or commendation, esp. for outstanding service or devotion to duty.
6.
a. a summons, esp. to appear in court.
b. a document containing such a summons.
7. a quotation showing a particular word or phrase in context.
8. mention or enumeration.
[1250–1300; Middle English< Late Latin citātiō= Latin citā(re) (see cite1) + -tiō -tion]
ci•ta′tion•al, adj.

citation

A summons ordering someone to appear in court.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.citation - an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statementcitation - an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statement
accolade, honor, laurels, honour, award - a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction; "an award for bravery"
2.citation - (law) the act of citing (as of spoken words or written passages or legal precedents etc.)
speech act - the use of language to perform some act
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
3.citation - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passagecitation - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage; "the student's essay failed to list several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article includes mention of similar clinical cases"
annotation, notation, note - a comment or instruction (usually added); "his notes were appended at the end of the article"; "he added a short notation to the address on the envelope"
photo credit - a note acknowledging the source of a published photograph
cross-index, cross-reference - a reference at one place in a work to information at another place in the same work
4.citation - a passage or expression that is quoted or cited
excerpt, excerption, extract, selection - a passage selected from a larger work; "he presented excerpts from William James' philosophical writings"
epigraph - a quotation at the beginning of some piece of writing
mimesis - the representation of another person's words in a speech
misquotation, misquote - an incorrect quotation
5.citation - a summons that commands the appearance of a party at a proceeding
process, summons - a writ issued by authority of law; usually compels the defendant's attendance in a civil suit; failure to appear results in a default judgment against the defendant
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
6.Citation - thoroughbred that won the triple crown in 1948

citation

noun
1. commendation, award, mention His citation says he showed outstanding and exemplary courage.
2. quotation, quote, reference, passage, illustration, excerpt The text is full of Biblical citations.
Translations

citation

[saɪˈteɪʃən]
A. Ncita f (US) (Jur) → citación f (Mil) → mención f, citación f
B. CPD citation index Níndice m de citación

citation

[saɪˈteɪʃən] n
(= commendation) → éloge m
(US) (= summons) → P.-V. m

citation

n
(= quote)Zitat nt; (= act of quoting)Zitieren nt
(Mil) → Belobigung f, → lobende Erwähnung
(Jur) → Vorladung f(vor Gericht)

citation

[saɪˈteɪʃn] ncitazione f
References in classic literature ?
Can we, then, by the citation of some of those instances wherein this thing of whiteness --though for the time either wholly or in great part stripped of all direct associations calculated to impart to it aught fearful, but, nevertheless, is found to exert over us the same sorcery, however modified; --can we thus hope to light upon some chance clue to conduct us to the hidden cause we seek?
He had himself experienced their vindictive cruelty, and his story deserves particular citation, as showing the hairbreadth adventures to which these solitary rovers of the wilderness are exposed.
I cannot better introduce the few poems which I shall present for your consideration, than by the citation of the Proem to Longfellow's "Waif":
Is Richard a monster in all this, or would Chancery be found rich in such precedents too if they could be got for citation from the Recording Angel?
Martin frowned inwardly at the citation of that worthy gentleman, and went on: "I put stamps on all my manuscripts and started them off to the editors again.
Note an interesting incident or two for citation in class.
Note definitely for citation in class passages of strong appeal to the various senses and of beautiful melody and cadence.
Special attention may be given to any one, or more, of the statements or suggestions in the text, considering its application in the poems read, with citation of illustrative lines.
I here close the citation which I have thought it my duty to make from Monsieur Maleine's narrative.
Casaubon; digestion was made difficult by the interference of citations, or by the rivalry of dialectical phrases ringing against each other in his brain.
41) Wilamowitz thinks one or other of these citations belongs to the Catalogue.