citational


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ci·ta·tion

 (sī-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of citing.
2.
a. A quotation of or explicit reference to a source for substantiation, as in a scholarly paper.
b. Law A reference to a previous court decision or other authority for a point of law, usually by case title and other information.
3. Enumeration or mention, as of facts, especially:
a. An official commendation for meritorious action, especially in military service: a citation for bravery.
b. A formal statement of the accomplishments of one being honored with an academic degree.
4. An official summons, especially one calling for appearance in court.

ci·ta′tion·al adj.
ci′ta·to′ry (sī′tə-tôr′ē) adj.

citational

(saɪˈteɪʃənəl)
adj
pertaining to citation
References in periodicals archive ?
Clear enough, in fact, that in a book on "gesture," the reader is certainly prompted to reflect upon the gesture, perhaps strictly off-handed, of citational disavowal.
Bruns, "Voices of Construction: On Susan Howe's Poetry and Poetics (A Citational Ghost Story)' Contemporary literature 50.
The author claims that Spike Lee's film "engages in a citational freeplay of colors, images, and texts .
Unlike The Araignment, which railed against women in general from within the citational tradition of misogyny, at first published under a proverbial pseudonym, Speght's response is presented as the work of a single author-critic responding to the creation of another individual author.
The effect of this multi-layering was a dizzying Brechtian-style alienation that de-emphasized gender difference by highlighting its "performativity": what Judith Butler calls "the reiterative and citational practice by which discourse produces the effects that it names" (2).
A form of Hemmings' citational practice is adopted by not attributing quoted phrases to specific respondents, but to indicate them through italics.
Whether sui generis in their content, like Bloom, with its faint sunburst, or Kid, with its winking burlap grin; or citational, like Night, in whose black slick lurked van Gogh's Starry Night, or Blue Styrofoam Seascape, bisected by a Sugimoto horizon, Friedman's sculpture-paintings finally feel like recursive exercises primarily designed to size up the space between his highly unorthodox forms and more conventionally "artistic" artifacts.
27) Louisa's fall, in short, is no less "a fall into quotation" than is the earlier, autumnal walk to Winthrop, where Anne's repetition of "poetical descriptions" (114-15) highlights the citational quality of the episode itself.
The impact of journals and authors on international business research: a citational analysis of JIBS articles.
for us, performance--what individual subjects do, say, 'act out'--is subsumed within, and must always be connected to, performativity, to the citational practices which reproduce and subvert discourse, and which at the same time enable and discipline subjects and their performances.
Although there are norms that govern what will and will not be real, and what will and will not he intelligible, they are called into question and reiterated at the moment in which performativity begins its citational practice.
Here is some citational corroboration from our database: