citator


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citator

(saɪˈteɪtə)
n
1. (Law) a legal publication listing cases and statutes, their history and current status
2. (Law) a person who cites, or quotes
References in periodicals archive ?
Trejo was the publications editor of The International Citator & Research Guide.
Now one of the people that's here from the NRB is Bill Hooks and he and his staff are in charge of the Blue Book, and the official citator in all of that.
See generally Susan Nevelow Mart & Jeffrey Luftig, The Case for Curation: The Relevance of Digest and Citator Results in Westlaw and Lexis (July 18, 2012), http://papers.
The decisions were located on the AustLII database, with some guidance from the LexisNexis 'CaseBase' and Thomson Legal Online 'FirstPoint' case citator services.
Judge Coven is the author of MASSACHUSETTS ARREST, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE CITATOR.
Currently, none of the free Web-based legal research tools has a citator service similar to Lexis' Shepherds, which instantly tells a user whether a given case is still good law.
In her NewsBreak, she notes that it won't put Lexis or Westlaw out of business because of date limitations and a lack of hyperlinks and a citator service.
CanLII innovations include the Reflex [27] citator.
Another useful research tool is the citator, which is an editorial resource that lets the practitioner assess the validity of case law and IRS administrative rulings.
49) For most of the twentieth century, Shepard's citator service was the industry standard, and an essential part of the legal research process to verify, that a found authority was still a valid source of law.