cite

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Related to citing: Citation

cite

 (sīt)
v. cit·ed, cit·ing, cites
v.tr.
1.
a. To quote or refer to (a book or author, for example) as an authority or example in making an argument.
b. Law To refer to (a previous court decision or other legal precedent), as when arguing a case.
2. To mention or bring forward as support, illustration, or proof: cited several instances of insubordinate behavior.
3.
a. To commend officially for meritorious action in military service.
b. To honor formally.
4. To issue a notice of violation to: was cited by the police for jaywalking.
v.intr. Law
To make reference to a previous court decision. Often used with to: The lower court cited to the Supreme Court decision issued last year.
n. Informal
A citation or quotation.

[Middle English citen, to summon, from Old French citer, from Latin citāre; see keiə- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

cit′a·ble adj.

cite

(saɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to quote or refer to (a passage, book, or author) in substantiation as an authority, proof, or example
2. (Military) to mention or commend (a soldier, etc) for outstanding bravery or meritorious action
3. (Law) to summon to appear before a court of law
4. to enumerate: he cited the king's virtues.
[C15: from Old French citer to summon, from Latin citāre to rouse, from citus quick, from ciēre to excite]
ˈcitable, ˈciteable adj
ˈciter n

cite1

(saɪt)

v.t. cit•ed, cit•ing.
1. to quote (a passage, book, author, etc.), esp. as an authority.
2. to mention in support, proof, or confirmation; refer to as an example: He cited instances of abuse.
3. to summon to appear in court.
4. to call to mind; recall: citing my gratitude to her.
5. to mention (a soldier, unit, etc.) in official dispatches, as for gallantry.
6. to commend, as for outstanding service or devotion to duty.
7. to summon or call; rouse to action.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin citāre to summon before a church court; in Latin, to hurry, set in motion, summon before a court, frequentative of ciēre to move]
cit′a•ble, cite′a•ble, adj.
cit′er, n.

cite2

(saɪt)

n.
[by shortening]

cite


Past participle: cited
Gerund: citing

Imperative
cite
cite
Present
I cite
you cite
he/she/it cites
we cite
you cite
they cite
Preterite
I cited
you cited
he/she/it cited
we cited
you cited
they cited
Present Continuous
I am citing
you are citing
he/she/it is citing
we are citing
you are citing
they are citing
Present Perfect
I have cited
you have cited
he/she/it has cited
we have cited
you have cited
they have cited
Past Continuous
I was citing
you were citing
he/she/it was citing
we were citing
you were citing
they were citing
Past Perfect
I had cited
you had cited
he/she/it had cited
we had cited
you had cited
they had cited
Future
I will cite
you will cite
he/she/it will cite
we will cite
you will cite
they will cite
Future Perfect
I will have cited
you will have cited
he/she/it will have cited
we will have cited
you will have cited
they will have cited
Future Continuous
I will be citing
you will be citing
he/she/it will be citing
we will be citing
you will be citing
they will be citing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been citing
you have been citing
he/she/it has been citing
we have been citing
you have been citing
they have been citing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been citing
you will have been citing
he/she/it will have been citing
we will have been citing
you will have been citing
they will have been citing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been citing
you had been citing
he/she/it had been citing
we had been citing
you had been citing
they had been citing
Conditional
I would cite
you would cite
he/she/it would cite
we would cite
you would cite
they would cite
Past Conditional
I would have cited
you would have cited
he/she/it would have cited
we would have cited
you would have cited
they would have cited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cite - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passagecite - a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage; "the student's essay failed to list several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article includes mention of similar clinical cases"
annotation, notation, note - a comment or instruction (usually added); "his notes were appended at the end of the article"; "he added a short notation to the address on the envelope"
photo credit - a note acknowledging the source of a published photograph
cross-index, cross-reference - a reference at one place in a work to information at another place in the same work
Verb1.cite - make reference to; "His name was mentioned in connection with the invention"
have in mind, think of, mean - intend to refer to; "I'm thinking of good food when I talk about France"; "Yes, I meant you when I complained about people who gossip!"
commend, remember - mention as by way of greeting or to indicate friendship; "Remember me to your wife"
speak of the devil - mention someone's name who just then appears
remember - mention favorably, as in prayer; "remember me in your prayers"
quote, cite - refer to for illustration or proof; "He said he could quote several instances of this behavior"
touch on - refer to or discuss briefly
invoke, appeal - cite as an authority; resort to; "He invoked the law that would save him"; "I appealed to the law of 1900"; "She invoked an ancient law"
namedrop - refer to people that one assumes one's interlocutors admire in order to try to impress them
bring up, raise - put forward for consideration or discussion; "raise the question of promotions"; "bring up an unpleasant topic"
drag up, dredge up - mention something unpleasant from the past; "Drag up old stories"
cross-refer - refer from one entry to another, as in catalogues, books, and lists
2.cite - commendcite - commend; "he was cited for his outstanding achievements"
acknowledge, notice - express recognition of the presence or existence of, or acquaintance with; "He never acknowledges his colleagues when they run into him in the hallway"; "She acknowledged his complement with a smile"; "it is important to acknowledge the work of others in one's own writing"
3.cite - refer to; "he referenced his colleagues' work"
authorship, penning, writing, composition - the act of creating written works; "writing was a form of therapy for him"; "it was a matter of disputed authorship"
indite, pen, write, compose - produce a literary work; "She composed a poem"; "He wrote four novels"
4.cite - repeat a passage from; "He quoted the Bible to her"
ingeminate, iterate, reiterate, repeat, restate, retell - to say, state, or perform again; "She kept reiterating her request"
quote, cite - refer to for illustration or proof; "He said he could quote several instances of this behavior"
misquote - quote incorrectly; "He had misquoted the politician"
5.cite - refer to for illustration or proof; "He said he could quote several instances of this behavior"
quote, cite - repeat a passage from; "He quoted the Bible to her"
cite, mention, refer, advert, name, bring up - make reference to; "His name was mentioned in connection with the invention"
6.cite - advance evidence forcite - advance evidence for      
bear witness, evidence, testify, prove, show - provide evidence for; "The blood test showed that he was the father"; "Her behavior testified to her incompetence"
7.cite - call in an official matter, such as to attend court
vouch - summon (a vouchee) into court to warrant or defend a title
send for, call - order, request, or command to come; "She was called into the director's office"; "Call the police!"
demand - summon to court

cite

verb
1. quote, name, evidence, advance, mention, extract, specify, allude to, enumerate, adduce She cites a favourite poem by George Herbert.
2. (Law) summon, call, subpoena The judge ruled a mistrial and cited the prosecutors for gross misconduct.

cite

verb
1. To refer to by name:
2. To bring forward for formal consideration:
Archaic: allege.
Translations

cite

[saɪt] VT
1. (= quote) → citar
2. (Jur) he was cited to appear in courtlo citaron para que se compareciera ante el tribunal
3. (Mil) → mencionar, citar

cite

[ˈsaɪt] vt
(= quote) [+ example] → citer
(in court) [+ man, woman] → citer; [fact] → citer

cite

vt
(= quote)anführen, zitieren
(Mil) → belobigen, lobend erwähnen (for wegen)
(Jur) → vorladen; he was cited to appearer wurde vorgeladen, er erhielt eine Vorladung; he was cited as the co-respondent (= mentioned)er wurde als der Dritte in der Scheidungssache genannt

cite

[saɪt] vtcitare
he was cited to appear in court (Law) → fu citato in tribunale
to cite as an example → portare come esempio

cite

vt. citar, referirse a.
References in classic literature ?
He was admitted daily after that, but was warned to keep still about his adventure and introduce no ex- citing topic.
Tell the judges, then, who is their improver; for you must know, as you have taken the pains to discover their corrupter, and are citing and accusing me before them.
Being subjects either of an absolute or limited monarchy, they have endeavored to heighten the advantages, or palliate the evils of those forms, by placing in comparison the vices and defects of the republican, and by citing as specimens of the latter the turbulent democracies of ancient Greece and modern Italy.
Inchbare's description of the man at the inn, by citing Arnold himself as being one of the hundreds of innocent people who answered to it
and a tedious and uphill road: then citing Homer as a witness that the gods may be influenced by men; for he also says:
Expatiating upon this learned and remarkable theory, and citing many curious statistical and other facts in its support, Sam Weller beguiled the time until they reached Dunchurch, where a dry postboy and fresh horses were procured; the next stage was Daventry, and the next Towcester; and at the end of each stage it rained harder than it had done at the beginning.
There is definitely a problem but it's not the senior citizens of our community and citing them with $114 tickets is not going to solve anything.
Bray objects to the book's definition of freedom--not by citing the actual one provided in the book (on pages 46-55) but by quoting my larger definition of Western culture, as if he thinks the latter is synonymous with freedom.
Citing earlier work on the diffusion of innovations, Crane (1972) stresses the role of scientific communities and the processes of social interaction and influence that underlie the exponential growth of science (pp.
Not only are surveyors citing higher numbers of deficiencies and cross-referencing a single fact pattern to multiple tag numbers, but the scope and severity assigned to these deficiencies is significantly higher, too.
Simplified provisioning rose from 4% of users citing it in Wave 2 to 14% in Wave 3, while the more complex automated failover dropped from 16% to 6% of user mentions.
Wilson is 68 and from out of state, but Hahn would not reveal his home state, citing a new CHP policy that prohibits officers from revealing that information.