Krebs cycle

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Krebs cycle

 (krĕbz)
n.
A series of enzymatic reactions in aerobic organisms involving oxidative metabolism of acetyl units and producing high-energy phosphate compounds such as ATP, which serve as the main source of cellular energy. Also called citric acid cycle, tricarboxylic acid cycle.

[After Sir Hans Adolf Krebs.]

Krebs cycle

n
(Biochemistry) a stage of tissue respiration: a series of biochemical reactions occurring in mitochondria in the presence of oxygen by which acetate, derived from the breakdown of foodstuffs, is converted to carbon dioxide and water, with the release of energy. Also called: citric acid cycle or tricarboxylic acid cycle

Krebs′ cy`cle


n.
the metabolic sequence of enzyme-driven reactions by which carbohydrates, proteins, and fatty acids produce carbon dioxide, water, and ATP.
[1940–45; after H. A. Krebs]

Krebs cycle

A series of chemical reactions in most aerobic organisms in which cells break down glucose and other molecules in the presence of oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and energy in the form of ATP. The Krebs cycle occurs in the mitochondria of all organisms except bacteria. Also called citric acid cycle.

Krebs cycle

(or citric acid cycle) A series of biochemical reactions in living cells that break down carbohydrates, releasing energy. See catabolism, metabolism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Krebs cycle - in all plants and animals: a series of enzymatic reactions in mitochondria involving oxidative metabolism of acetyl compounds to produce high-energy phosphate compounds that are the source of cellular energy
metabolic process, metabolism - the organic processes (in a cell or organism) that are necessary for life
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
oxidative phosphorylation - an enzymatic process in cell metabolism that synthesizes ATP from ADP